KPA News Archive - 2011

 

Updated December 16


KPA News

 

SWINE INDUSTRY ASKED TO PARTICIPATE IN FEED EFFICIENCY SURVEY

Source: Kansas State University 

Kansas State University swine nutritionists are teaming up with their Iowa State University counterparts in asking swine producers, industry consultants and advisors to the pork industry to participate in an online survey about swine feed efficiency. The survey answers will help guide research direction and educational programs to improve feed efficiency and lower feed costs.

The survey, which can be found at http://tinyurl.com/swinesurvey, aims to identify gaps in current industry knowledge to help researchers better prepare educational materials and plan on-farm commercial research over the next four years, as part of an Agricultural and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) USDA grant, said Joel DeRouchey, livestock specialist with K-State Research and Extension.

The survey should take less than 15 minutes to complete. No responses will be individually identified - all responses will be summarized together, DeRouchey said. Survey participants are not required to give contact information, although if they choose to do so, the research team will provide feed efficiency project updates, including research results and publications as they become available.

"Names and contact information of individuals completing the survey will be collected separately from their survey responses and will not be associated in any way with submitted answers," he said. "Respondents' names and contact information will remain confidential and will not be used for any other purpose other than to provide them with the latest feed efficiency research updates." 

The deadline to take the survey is Feb. 20, 2012. Questions can be directed to DeRouchey at jderouch@ksu.edu or 785-532-2280.


2012 Kansas Pork Association Wendell Moyer Scholarship Announced

In 1956, Wendell Moyer helped organize a small group of pork producers into the Kansas Swine Improvement
Association. Their purpose was to work together to make their businesses more profitable while keeping the
swine industry healthy and flourishing statewide. The Kansas Pork Association is working every day to achieve
this same goal.

Through support of youth who have demonstrated an interest in the swine industry, the Kansas Pork Association
is working to encourage participation in pork production while building our leaders of tomorrow.

Current Kansas State University students who have completed between 25 and 100 credit hours are eligible to
apply for a $1,000 scholarship by completing this form by January 27, 2012, and sending it to the Kansas Pork
Association office. Previous winners of any Wendell Moyer Student Enrichment Grants are ineligible to apply.
For additional information, contact the KPA office at (785) 776-0442.

Award Process
• Applications will be reviewed by the Kansas Pork Association.
• The recipient will be notified by February 6, 2012.
• The recipient will be recognized during the KSU Swine Profitability Conference held February 28, 2012, at the
K-State Union. Please plan to attend.
• Awards will be paid directly to the recipient upon proof of enrollment.

Application - Download by clicking on  Wendell Moyer Schlolarship Application
• Completed application- Please use the form provided.
• Photo- Each applicant must furnish a recent photograph, no smaller than 2" x 3". Please enclose the picture in
an envelope and attach the envelope to the application. Do not staple or tape the photo directly to the application.
Do not send Polaroid or instant photos. Please identify photo with applicants name on back.
• High School and/or college transcript(s)


Please submit all materials, including the application, photo, and transcript(s) to :
Kansas Pork Association
2601 Farm Bureau Road
Manhattan, KS 66502


 

Jane Good, wife of Don Good, former head of Kansas State University's Department of Animal Sciences and Industry passes

 
 
Memorial Service:  Date:  12/17/2011
Time:  11:00 a.m. Saturday
Location:  First United Methodist Church
612 Poyntz Avenue
Manhattan, Kansas 66502
Visitation:  Date:  12/16/2011
Time:  4:00-6:00 pm Friday
Location:  First United Methodist Church
612 Poyntz Avenue
Manhattan, Kansas 66502

 

Obituary: 

Jane L. Good, 87, of Manhattan, KS died peacefully at home at Meadowlark Hills the morning of December 13, 2011, with her husband of nearly 64 years, Don L. Good, nearby. Jane Lenore Swick, daughter of Wyler K. and Edyth Swick, was born January 22, 1924 at home on the family farm in Van Wert, OH. She was the oldest of 4 girls. 

Jane graduated from Convoy (OH) High School in 1942 and began nurses training at the Ft. Wayne Methodist Hospital School of Nursing in Ft. Wayne, IN. When she graduated in 1945, she worked for a year in Obstetrics and the Nursery before departing for a 3-month post-graduate course in operating room nursing at Charity Hospital in New Orleans, LA. Just prior to leaving for New Orleans, her sister, Judy and boyfriend (and now husband), Fred Good, set Jane up with Fred's brother, Don, for a date. There was a spark! 

Jane returned to Ft. Wayne as supervisor of the operating room at Methodist Hospital and the budding romance continued. On Dec. 27, 1947, Jane married Don, a 1947 graduate of The Ohio State University. They married at the Trinity Lutheran Church in Convoy, Ohio and moved to Manhattan, Kansas where Don taught Animal Science, coached the livestock judging team, and was later Department Head at Kansas State University. 

Jane was a devoted homemaker, wife, mother, and volunteer, spending some of her happiest times in the kitchen cooking for a crowd and traveling all over the U.S. and world with Don. Church activities were important to Jane and at First United Methodist Church, participated as Lay leader, was active in church circle, sang in Choralaires, and helped with many bazaars, soup suppers, church dinners, and providing transportation for elderly or infirmed. 

Jane gave generously of her time to Chapter BD P.E.O., University Social Club, serving as President and chairing many committees, and Christian Women's Club, serving as President and Treasurer. Jane helped start Federation of Handicapped Children (now Citizens) in Manhattan and was a Board member of Kansas Children's Service League. She volunteered with Red Cross/blood mobile for 40 years, served as 4-H sewing and cooking leader and was in the Extension Homemakers Unit (EHU). 

Besides caring for her family, Jane's most enjoyable activity was entertaining judging teams, KSU faculty/staff/graduate students and Sunday school members. Jane and Don opened their home to many students who needed a place to stay and they both advocated for Heifer Project International. 

Survivors include three children: Linda (and Joe Mikols), East Lansing, MI; Craig (and Amy), Olsburg, KS; and Gary (at Kansas Neurological Institute), Topeka, KS Two beloved grandchildren: Laura (and Isidro Linan Jimenez), Abu Dhabi, UAE; and Grant, Mound Ridge, KS Three sisters: Jean (and Norman) Covert, Tiffin, OH; Judy (and Fred) Good, Charlotte, MI; and Norma Ann (and Charles Boroff), Ft. Jennings, OH 

Memorial Services for Mrs. Good will be held at 11:00 a.m. Saturday, at the First United Methodist Church in Manhattan, with Pastor Kay Scarbrough officiating. Private inurnment will be in the Sunrise Cemetery in Manhattan. 

The family will greet friends from 4:00 until 6:00 p.m. Friday at the First United Methodist Church-Fellowship Hall, 612 Poyntz, in Manhattan. 

Online condolences may be left for the family by clicking on "Send Condolences"

Memorial contributions are suggested to the First United Methodist Church or the Meadowlark Hills Good Samaritan Fund. Contributions may be left in care of the Yorgensen-Meloan-Londeen Funeral Home, 1616 Poyntz Avenue, Manhattan, Kansas 66502.



KPA News


Protect Your Farm


Recent news stories about hog rustlers and vandalism prompted me to encourage all producers to review their farm's security procedures.  Below is information from guide developed by the National Pork Board. To download the guide, click here.

It has security checklists which are intentionally extensive. Most likely, no producer will be able to implement all the procedures listed.  These are just ideas for you to use in  developing  a security program tailored to your farm or production system.

General access
• Limit farm entry to one gated road. Keep the gate locked when not in use.
• Secure the farm perimeter using fencing.
• Minimize the number of entrances to restricted areas within the farm. Keep restricted areas locked when not in use.
• Have occupied homes or offices at roads leading to the farm to help prevent unauthorized intruders.
• Place buzzers on gates to alert you when a vehicle or person has crossed the farm entrance.
• Don't advertise vacations or other times when buildings will be vacant.
• Minimize places where people can easily hide within and around the farm.
• Ensure areas surrounding and within farm buildings are well lit. Try to have back-up lighting for emergencies.

Physical security
• Implement a master key system. 
• Check key codes when purchasing locksets at hardware stores.
• Select industrial grade locksets and other door hardware. Lesser equipment will not hold up to farm conditions and will need to be replaced frequently.
• Stamp all keys with "Do Not Duplicate".  This procedure can prevent illegitimate copying of keys. 
• Remember to change key codes when employees leave. 
• Swap padlocks from different areas when an employee leaves or is terminated. This will prevent you from having to re-key or purchase new locks.
• Do not put hand-turning dead bolts on the inside of glass doors.
• Keep windows, doors, and storage areas locked when rooms are not in use.
• Use metal or metal-clad doors. These doors are more secure than wooden doors

Fire security
• Use fire doors.
• Place smoke, heat, and fire detectors throughout the farm.
• Use fire alarms and check for proper function regularly.
• Locate fire extinguishers in strategic places.
• Have a "No Smoking" policy.
• Store important written and digital information in fireproof containers.
• Protect against lightning strikes.

Surveillance
• Use electronic sensors (motion detectors, door alarms, glass break sensors) or other surveillance equipment (video cameras) to monitor the integrity of your physical barriers. This equipment can be linked to an off-site security system if cost-effective.
• Have regular but unpredictable security patrols by employees, security guards, or local law enforcement.
• Plant/trim trees and shrubs so that they do not block lighting, provide concealment to criminals, or block visibility of security patrols.

If you suspect unauthorized entry
• Investigate all information regarding the intrusion or suspicious activity immediately.
• Call the appropriate law enforcement authorities.
• Isolate any animals that may have been contacted by the intruder.

Vehicles
• Keep parking areas outside of the perimeter fencing or at least away from sensitive areas (storage areas for water, feed, or hazardous materials).
• Lock all parked vehicles when not in use and keep the keys in a secure area. 
• Monitor vehicles for inappropriate contents or unauthorized/unusual activity.
• Keep vehicle logs to record date, origins, destinations, and reason for movement.
• Attend vehicles carrying livestock at all times, especially at truck stops and weigh stations.

Visitors
• Have a "No Visitor" policy for non-service individuals if possible.
• Have a separate policy in place for essential visitors such as consultants, service people, and health professionals that are both (1) known to you and (2) have visited the farm on a regular basis. These essential visitors should be handled as non-service individuals if they do not meet the above criteria.
• Post signs to inform all visitors of rules.
• Designate a parking area for all visitors.
• Designate a check-in, check-out area for all visitors with a sign-in sheet. Record names, addresses, phone numbers, reason for visit, time since last contact with swine, and facilities entered for each visitor.
• Make non-service visitors provide an authorized, valid reason for entry and proof of identity.
• Escort non-service visitors at all times. Visitors should never be allowed to wander the premises.
• Prevent non-service visitors from accessing storage areas, locker rooms, computer areas, or areas where keys are kept. Clearly mark these areas with a "No Visitors" sign.



KSU News

Kansas State University Swine Day

Producers, students and industry members packed themselves into a full house at the KSU Alumni Center on Thursday, November 17th for the 2011 K-State Swine Day. As expected, the day consisted of attendees listening to some of the brightest minds within the pork industry presenting about current research findings and industry trends. 

The morning included a presentation by Dr. Steve Henry, Dr. Lisa Tokach and Dr. Megan Potter from the Abilene Animal Hospital on "Failure to Thrive: The Effect of Vitamin D at Processing." 

The afternoon program featured a presentation on "Global Grain and Livestock Outlook: How It Will Impact You," presented by Joe Kerns, Risk Assessment and Management, Ames, Iowa. 

The K-State Swine Team also discussed practical application of the latest K-State swine research to help improve net return of swine business and present breakthroughs in some novel areas. The technology trade show featured industry partners exhibiting the latest products and services for your business. 

The day concluded with the ice cream reception. For more information on Swine Day or for a summary of research presented by Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service visitwww.KSUswine.org or contact Jim Nelssen at jnelssen@ksu.edu

For pictures of 2011 K-State Swine Day, visit our Facebook  page.



Meat Export Federation News


December 15

Pork Exports Set New Annual Value Record
Editor's notes: 
- Export statistics refer to both muscle cuts and variety meat unless otherwise indicated.

October was another excellent month for U.S. Pork exports, according to statistics released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Pork exports set a new all-time monthly value record at $573.9 million, up 41 percent from last year, which pushed the cumulative value through October to a new annual record of $4.93 billion - breaking the previous high of $4.88 billion in 2008.

In addition to setting a new value record, pork export volume for October was also very strong at 442.5 million pounds, 24 percent higher than last year and the second-largest volume total ever. Through October, 2011 export volume is 17 percent ahead of last year's pace at 4 billion pounds. October exports equated to 24 percent of pork muscle cut production and 27 percent when including both muscle cuts and variety meat. For January through October, these ratios were 23 percent and 27 percent, respectively, compared to 19 percent and 24 percent last year. October exports equated to $58.42 per hog slaughtered, bringing the 2011 total to $54.68. This compares to $42.26 in October 2010 and $43.72 for all of last year.

China was the largest volume market for U.S. Pork in October at 107.3 million pounds, more than double the year-ago volume and setting another monthly record. Through October, exports to the China/Hong Kong region were up 60 percent to 797.4 million pounds, valued at $654.4 million.

Strong October exports to Japan further solidified its position as the leading value market for U.S. Pork. Through October, export volume to Japan reached 904 million pounds which is up 14 percent over last year and valued at a remarkable $1.62 billion. This value total is 19 percent higher than last year's pace and rapidly approaching a new all-time value record of $1.65 billion set in 2010.

Mexico is the top volume destination for U.S. Pork, with October exports up slightly in volume over last year but 15 percent higher in value. This pushed the 2011 export totals to 947.8 million pounds which is down 2 percent, valued at $830.6 million. With a strong finish to the year, the all-time value record for Mexico, $986 million, set last year, could be within reach.

The volume and value records for Canada (in 2010, 403.6 million pounds valued at $618 million) also are likely to fall as strong October exports pushed its total to 372.2 million pounds valued $604.8 million - up 13 percent and 18 percent, respectively, from last year.

Exports to South Korea, which had already broken their previous records, remained strong in October reaching 355.2 million pounds which is up 133 percent and valued at $418.1 million. Exports to Korea have been bolstered this year by duty-free access for some imported pork cuts and a severe shortage of domestic product. Once the Korea-U.S. FTA is implemented, duties of 25 percent on the most commonly traded U.S. cuts will be reduced to 16 percent.

Another market topping its previous volume and value records was Australia, as 2011 exports reached 118.7 million pounds valued at $173 million - up 18 percent and 37 percent, respectively, over last year's then-record pace.

Led by surging exports to Chile, the Central and South America region also topped last year's record totals by reaching 128 million pounds which is up 23 percent and valued at nearly $150 million. The outlook for this region also was bolstered by ratification of the free trade agreements with Colombia and Panama, which hold great promise for U.S. Pork. 



NPPC News

Coalition Urges Japan's Inclusion In TPP Talks

A coalition of food and agricultural organizations recently urged the Obama administration to work with Japan to smooth the way for that country's participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a multilateral trade agreement. Japan recently announced its intention to join the TPP negotiations, which currently include Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam. 

In a letter sent to U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk, the coalition said including Japan in the trade talks would generate enormous interest and support in U.S. agriculture. "It would also spur even broader interest among other Asia-Pacific countries, which could lead to the type of Asia-Pacific regional arrangement envisioned by the administration when you embarked on these talks last year," said the coalition. 

Japan's economy is second only to China's in the region, and it is the fourth largest agricultural export market for the United States despite the fact that it maintains substantial import barriers. Even with the barriers, U.S. exports to Japan in 2010 were nearly $12 billion. The coalition warned that Japan likely would enter free trade talks with the European Union in 2012 and with other countries if its TPP bid is rejected. 

"The opportunity to include Japan in the TPP negotiations must be seized," said the coalition. "It is an opportunity that may not present itself again."



National Pork Board News

December 15

Antibiotic Forum Offers Insights
The Pork Checkoff was a participant in the recent symposium, Antibiotic Use in Food Animals: A Dialogue for a Common Purpose, in Chicago. Organized by the National Institute for Animal Health, a diverse cross-section of livestock industry professionals and farm groups met to tackle the complex issue.

A key objective, according to symposium moderator, Scott Hurd, an Iowa State University associate professor, was to identify and fill information and research gaps regarding antibiotic use and its relationship to human health. As former deputy undersecretary for food safety at the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection
Service, he brought an insider's view on the safety of the nation's food supply and the actual risk to public health from antibiotic use in livestock.

For public health to be negatively affected, Hurd said the human health risk requires sufficient exposure that will result in actual harm. For that to happen, the following would need to occur:

1. The antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are selected in the food animal as a result of antimicrobial use, AND,

2. humans ingest sufficient antimicrobial-resistant bacteria present in the relevant food product from treated animals, AND

3. disease, which causes the patient to seek medical care and treatment with an antibiotic to which the bacteriais resistant, AND

4. this results in an adverse health outcome.

"Without a causal pathway, you have no risk," said Hurd, joining other presenters in admitting that logical, scientific facts may not satisfy today's consumers. "Ultimately, that's a value-based question that each consumer must decide."

While those that gathered didn't agree on everything regarding antibiotic usage and its effect on public health, they concluded that antibiotic use in food animals is a complex issue that is often oversimplified, often resulting in the public being misled.

Finding Common Ground
Mike Bumgarner, vice president, Center for Food and Animal Issues, Ohio Farm Bureau Federation and member of NIAA executive committee, summed up the main messages agreed on by most participants.

• Using an antibiotic or sing more of it will not necessarily cause resistance to that antibiotic to appear or increase from current levels.

• The judicious use of antibiotics in food animals is sometimes required to provide safe, nutritious food at a reasonable price. And prevention of infectious disease improves animal and human health.

• There is so much that the human health community does not know about why antibiotic resistance occurs. As such, antibiotics should be used appropriately not only in animal agriculture, but also in the human population.

"We will continue to participate in a dialogue about antibiotics and how they can continue be used to protect animal health and public health," said Jennifer Koeman, the Pork Checkoff's director of producer and public health. "We represent America's pork producers in seeking solutions based on sound science and demonstrating our shared values with consumers who depend on our industry to provide wholesome, safe food."

For more on antibiotic use and public health, go to pork.org and search for antibiotics, public health. For more about proper on-farm antibiotic use, search for Pork Quality Assurance® Plus.

Pork Steals the Show at Cooking Schools  
Home cooking is a catalyst that brings people together, and enthusiastic audiences at Taste of Home cooking schools are discovering delectable new pork recipes that are sure to please any palate.

"The Pork Checkoff is excited to be a national sponsor of Taste of Home's Cooking Schools, which attract hundreds of participants who like the down-home style of the recipes," says Dianne Bettin, a pork producer from Truman, Minn., who chairs the Checkoff's Domestic Marketing committee. "Taste of Home Cooking Schools offer a great avenue to inspire home cooks to use pork, help them feel good about feeding it to their families and teach them how to be successful in cooking it properly."

This fall, Taste of Home hosted cooking schools in 120 markets across the country. Two pork dishes (including Roast  Pork Tenderloin Sliders with Cranberry Sauce and Pickled Onions) were among the 10 recipes demonstrated at each event. With up to 1,000 people attending each show, the Pork® Be inspiredSM message could potentially be shared with up to 120,000 people, says Laurie Bever, director of consumer marketing for the Pork Checkoff.

"The shows create a lot of buzz and cooking excitement," adds Bever, who notes that attendees received a gift bag including a pork recipe brochure; a cooking show magazine filled with recipes, including 15 pork recipes; a pork cooking chart; and a $1-off coupon for fresh pork. "The great benefit of participating in the Taste of Home Cooking Schools is the ability to engage directly with our consumer target. The people who attend are interested in cooking, look for new ideas and come with a positive attitude to hear more."

Home cooks think pink
Taste of Home's Cooking Schools also offered a perfect opportunity to share new cooking guidelines, which show that pork can be consumed safely when cooked to a lower internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit, followed by a three-minute rest time.

The Pork Checkoff's consumer research has consistently shown that Americans have a tendency to overcook common cuts of pork, says Mary Kelpinski, executive director of Michigan Pork Producers Association (MPPA), which helped sponsor four Taste of Home cooking schools in Michigan this fall. "It's been quite interesting to hear the comments that the Taste of Home chefs made during the shows. They hit our key messages about pork's versatility and the new 145-degree cooking temperature."

To reinforce these messages, representatives from the MPPA visited with consumers at the Michigan shows and handed out samples of grilled, boneless pork chops, along with pork nutrition information.

This ability to reach consumers one-on-one is invaluable, notes Bettin, who is a Taste of Home field editor. "Taste of Home is a trusted source to promote the safety of our product with the new cooking temperature, and their cooking schools offer an effective way to get great pork recipes in home cooks' kitchens."

"Culinologists" Discover What Really Makes Bacon Sizzle
Most chefs will admit that bacon has long been one of their secret ingredients, and leading "culinologists" (research chefs and food technologists) are rediscovering why bacon remains the go-to ingredient to captivate the palate of the American consumer.

"There's no such thing as too much bacon, the most magical of meats," says Jenny Rosoff, president of Village Green Foods, Inc. in Irvine, Calif., where the Pork Checkoff recently hosted a Bacon 101 seminar for a joint meeting of the Pacific/Southwest Chapter of the  Research Chefs Association  and the  Southern California Chapter of the Institute of Food Technologists. "Bacon adds flavor and texture, and it's also comfort food--and in this economy, people want as much comfort as they can afford."

During the two-hour "Pork Bellies to Bacon" presentation, Pork Checkoff staff shared bacon facts and history, processing (complete with a demonstration with a pork belly), food trends, recipes and more with more than 120 culinologists. The seminar concluded with a sample tasting of five distinct styles and flavors of bacon, from applewood-smoked bacon to maple-flavored bacon.

"People have shown an incredible appetite for all things bacon," says Paul Perfilio, national foodservice marketing manager for the Pork Checkoff, who conducted the Bacon 101 seminar. "In the last several years, trend spotters have named bacon as America's top food trend, and bacon mania continues."

Demand for bacon is growing, adds Perfilio, who notes that:

• 69 percent of all foodservice operators purchase bacon.

• The foodservice market uses more than 1.7 billion pounds of bacon each year. 

•  Bacon-related menu items have increased by more than 7 percent annually in the last few years, according to Technomic, a consulting and research firm serving the food industry.

Bacon makes it better
Bacon has moved beyond a breakfast staple to become the third condiment, right up there with salt and pepper, says Perfilio, who customizes Bacon 101 to his audiences' interests. Keeping the presentation informal encourages audience interaction, adds Perfilio, who notes that the West Coast culinologists were amazed by the range and flavors of bacons, including naturally-cured products and low-sodium varieties.

"I was riveted the whole time," noted one audience member. "The presentation was great, and the tasting was even better."

Bacon 101 was a hit, agrees Rosoff, a self-described "pork-o-phile" who is also interested in the Pork Checkoff's Ham 101, Sausage 101 and Pork Ribs 101 seminars. "The Pork Checkoff staff is amazing to work with. They are friendly, well prepared and knowledgeable about all things pork, and we look forward to working with them again."

Pork Works Its Magic on Restaurant Menus
Leading restaurants across America are offering more pork-inspired menus, which have become a tour de force of inventive dishes and appetizing ingredients.

With a 7 percent increase in menu mentions over the past year, pork is now being showcased in appetizers, entrées and sides, according to Technomic, a consulting and research firm serving the food industry.

"Pork is essential in foodservice," says Jarrod Sutton, assistant vice president of channel marketing for the Pork Checkoff. "Our marketing group has been working hard to help drive pork demand and has seen much success in 2011, including the establishment of pulled pork as a menu 'must have.'"

Pulled pork has been showcased not only at national chains like Quizno's and Subway, but also in regional chains like Togo's and Pita Pit. "Pulled pork is versatile, flavorful and serves as a great base for countless cuisines that are on-trend," Sutton says. "It also presents itself as a terrific value for operators and consumers alike."

Pork brings a lot to the table 
Bacon has also become a key ingredient on many menus, says Sutton, who notes that 69 percent of all foodservice operators purchase bacon, and demand continues to grow.

Technomic's look at recent pork dishes reveals that bacon, sausage and ham are the most common pork ingredients on menus. The data also show that pork is increasingly being used in combination with other proteins. Pork saw a 15 percent increase in shellfish dishes, 13 percent in chicken dishes and 8 percent in both beef dishes and burger dishes during the second quarter of 2011.

"Restaurants are using pork more often in main dishes and as an accompanying ingredient in menu items for various reasons," says Bernadette Noone, director of the Technomic MenuMonitor, which tracks additions to leading independent and chain restaurant menus. "First, the higher cost of beef has made pork a nice substitute in combo dishes. The popularity of bacon is another key factor. For the last few years, we've seen bacon-related menu items increase by over 7 percent annually."

Beyond bacon, MenuMonitor shows that many other types of pork are also being featured in new dishes, including:

• Red Beans & Rice with Andouille sausage at Applebee's Neighborhood Grill & Bar
• Wood Grilled Chorizo Sliders at Bahama Breeze
• Memphis BBQ Skins with pulled pork at Chili's Grill & Bar

Pork® Be inspiredsm has given the Pork Checkoff a solid platform to build effective, successful marketing strategies for a variety of pork cuts in various foodservice outlets, Sutton says. "From our national advertising to retail customer marketing to foodservice, this call-to-action message is resonating with consumers, and it works with foodservice operators, too."



KPA Producer Resources

SPCC Compliance Date Extension for Farm

On October 18, 2011, the U.S. EPA amended the date by which farms must prepare or amend and implement their Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plans, to May 10, 2013. If EPA receives no adverse comment by November 2, 2011, then the rule will become effective on November 7, 2011.

An overwhelming segment of the continental United States was affected by flooding during the spring and summer of 2011. Other areas were impacted by devastating fires.  Many counties in many states were declared disaster areas by either the federal or state government or both. As a result, EPA believes that because of their unique nature farms were disproportionately affected and need additional time to prepare and implement a Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan.

The amendment does not remove the regulatory requirement for owners or operators of farms in operation before August 16, 2002, to maintain and continue implementing an SPCC Plan in accordance with the SPCC regulations then in effect. Such farms continue to be required to maintain plans during the interim until the applicable compliance date for amending and implementing the amended Plans. Finally, the amendment does not relieve farms from the liability of any oil spills that occur.

To see more information, click on EPA SPCC Plans

KPA Community Outreach Program 

The Pork Community Outreach is designed to assist individual pork producers in becoming more involved and positively visible in their local communities. The KPA is offering matching funds on the expenses on selected community relations activities. The purpose of this program is to multiply the positive effects of pork producer involvement in the communities where hogs are raised.

To be eligible you must:

Fill out a cost share request form and submit it to the KPA at least two weeks prior to your event and submit design ideas to the KPA so that appropriate logos and messages may be included.

Click on  Community Outreach to download a form.


PQA Plus Site Assessment Rebate Program

The Kansas Pork Association, the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council are encouraging all producers to become PQA Plus certified and achieve PQA Plus Site Status. The purpose of this program is to encourage producers to be proactive in providing the best possible care for their animals and show commitment to the ethical principles of pork production as outlined in the We Care responsible pork initiative.

Having a PQA Plus advisor review your operation can both improve the well-being and productivity of animals in your care by noting changes or additions that may not otherwise be noticed.

The Kansas Pork Association is offering a $100 rebate to Kansas Pork Producers completing a PQA Plus Site Assesment. The funding is available on a first-come-first-serve basis.

The following requirements and stipulations apply:

Click here to download the  rebate form.

Please contact Tim Stroda at kpa@kspork.org or (785) 776-0442 with questions or to see if funds are still available.


KPA Classifieds

The KPA Producer-to-Producer Classified Section is provided free of charge to producers who are looking for a way to advertise to other producers. Contact the KPA office to get your ad listed.



Kansas GOLD Inc. working to update producer's informationKansas GOLD

Garry Keeler, program coordinator for Kansas GOLD Inc., is now working to update the yearly information needed to recertify facilities. Kansas GOLD Inc. will be contacting producers as their certification becomes due. The program has also recently started working with several producers to begin the process of applying for new permits.

The GOLD program is designed to ensure that when a regulator visits your farm, the information they request can be found easily and is packaged in a pre-approved format. The process begins with a visit to your farm by the Kansas GOLD coordinator, who will begin by examining your KDHE permit for each facility number. This permit tells the coordinator what information needs to be collected and kept on file.

Kansas GOLD Inc. provides a cost-effective manner to ensure your operation is in compliance. For information, please click on GOLD or contact the KPA office at (785) 776-0442 or e-mail to kpa@kspork.org


Updated November 4


KPA News


DEADLINE TO APPLY FOR EQIP COST-SHARE FUNDING IS NOVEMBER 15

The deadline to apply for cost-share funds through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) is November 15. EQIP assists livestock producers trying to comply with environmental regulations by paying for up to 75% of the costs associated with some projects. 

Farmers and ranchers interested in applying for EQIP should contact their local Natural Resources Conservation Service office. Applications received by November 15 will be evaluated for fiscal year 2012 funding.

KPA grills at the KSU-Missouri Football game

The Kansas Pork Association teamed up with the National Pork Board and Kansas State Athletics on a grilling promotion before the KSU vs. Missouri football game on Saturday, October 8. The Pork Board's "We Care" trailer served over 300 lbs. of pork loin and hundreds of recipe brochures were handed out, just outside the southeast gate to the stadium. Producers who were willing to help with the promotion got a game ticket and watched as the Wildcats pulled off their 5th win of the season. KPA would like to sincerely thank the many volunteers that worked the event and Seaboard Foods for supplying the pork loin.

 

 

KPA joins Taste of Home Cooking School in Park City

The Taste of Home Cooking School is America's leading cooking school program that inspires more than 300,000 passionate consumers each year at 300 events across the country. On October 14, KPA joined over 1,000 home cooks at Hartman Arena in Park City for a 1 1/2 hour cooking demonstration showcasing easy-to-prepare recipes, creative crafting ideas and decorating ideas. KPA also hosted a booth with coupons recipes, diced pork loin samples and an onstage giveaway to support the National Pork Board's national sponsorship of the cooking schools.

Looking to volunteer and receive free tickets to a Taste of Home Cooking School? This fall, KPA will attend one more location of Taste of Home Cooking Schools in Lawrence at the Holiday Inn on November 15. KPA will interact with home cooks during these events. Contact Jodi at the KPA office and join her at the cooking school - she could always use an extra hand to feed the 1,000+ event attendees!



KSU News

Swine Producers Urged to Guard Against Aflatoxin in Corn


Soaring temperatures and drought conditions through parts of Kansas and other states are sparking some cases of aflatoxin in corn, which means swine producers should be vigilant about what they're feeding, according to Kansas State University scientists.

"Aflatoxin is a toxic metabolite produced by the ear-rotting fungusAspergillus flavus,"  said Doug Jardine, state plant pathology leader with K-State Research and Extension. "It is favored by hot, humid and droughty conditions during the grain fill period."

K-State extension swine specialists Mike Tokach and Joel DeRouchey outlined several points for producers to keep in mind regarding feeding corn to swine.

· Harvest contaminated corn fields as quickly as possible. Once it appears, toxin levels appear to continue to increase in fields due to mold growth.

· Clean the grain if possible, before storage. Removing damaged kernels lowers toxin levels (by about 50 percent).

· Store at less than 15 percent moisture (13 percent or less is ideal) to limit further fungal growth and toxin production.

· Flush to clean the system after handling contaminated corn (put flush in a contaminated bin).

 

· Consider adding propionic acid to corn before it goes into storage if fungus is present and a concern. 0.5 percent addition of propionic acid limits further fungal growth.

· Monitor grain bin temperatures. Good grain management is important, as hot spots will increase fungal growth and toxin production.

· Segregate corn into high and low level bins if possible. Corn with less than 20 parts per billion can be fed in sow, nursery and last finisher diets. Corn with greater than 20 ppb can be fed to finishing pigs.  

· Use low test weight corn quickly. It does not store well.

· Monitor DDGS (dried distillers grains with soluble). Aflatoxin may be four times higher in DDGS than in the corn used to make it

"Keep in mind that aflatoxin is a carcinogen, and that levels build up in the body over time," Tokach said. "So, when feeding corn that contains aflatoxin, there may be reduced feed intake in the short term, but it's the long term where the biggest negative impact can occur."

When feeding in grow finish situations, typically there is no adverse effect if corn contains under 200 ppb aflatoxin, but at 200 to 400 ppb reduced growth can occur and immune systems can be compromised, he said. At 400 to 800 ppb, liver lesions can occur.

When feeding aflatoxin-infected corn to sows, there is typically no effect under 100 ppb, Tokach said. If levels are in the 500 to 750 ppb range, pigs will grow more slowly due to aflatoxin in the sow's milk. There does not appear, however, to be any effect on conception rates.

If feeding infected corn to nursery pigs, there is no effect if the aflatoxin is kept under 20 ppb, he said.  

"Producers who have high aflatoxin corn should use a binder, such as bentonite or aluminosilicate at 10 pounds per ton," DeRouchey said. "Research shows that bentonite will bind up to 700 ppb of aflatoxin. You do not need to add a binder to finishing diets, except last finisher situations, if levels are under 200 ppb."

Even though research shows that higher levels of aflatoxin can be tolerated when bentonite is added to the diet, Food and Drug Administration regulations require that corn fed to young pigs contain less than 20 ppb, for breeding animals less than 100 ppb, and for finishing pigs, less than 200. If the corn has greater than 200 ppb, FDA rules indicate that it should be blended with other corn to lower the level to 200 ppb or less before feeding. Blended corn must be used on-site and cannot be sold.

The swine specialists encouraged producers to use clean corn (less than 20 ppb) for nursery and lactating sows and feed corn with over 20 ppb aflatoxin to finishing pigs.


International Conference on Feed Efficiency in Swine

Where: Hilton Hotel/Qwest Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA
When: November 8th and 9th, 2011.

The International Conference on Feed Efficiency in Swine is being organized as a forum to present the full breadth of knowledge on swine feed efficiency. As such, it will cover topics that range from the influence of feed processing on feed efficiency, or the role of dietary amino acids (or energy) on feed efficiency through to the role of genetic selection on feed efficiency. The program will appeal to anyone involved in the more technical aspects of pork production, including producers, nutritionists, veterinarians, geneticists, etc. The organizing committee invites you to attend this very timely event, held when feed costs are among the highest in memory.

This conference is a joint venture between Iowa State University and Kansas State University. For more infromation, click on www.ans.iastate.edu/ICFES

Kansas State University Swine Day
Thursday, November 17
KSU Alumni Center
Manhattan, Kan

8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Technology trade show

Morning Program
Master of Ceremonies - Dave Nichols, Teaching Coordinator, Animal Sciences and Industry, KSU

9:45 a.m.
Welcome 
Dr. Ken Odde, Department Head, Animal Sciences and Industry, KSU

10 a.m.
Current K-State Swine Research to Help Improve Net Return of a Swine Business
K-State Swine Team will discuss practical application of the latest production research and present breakthroughs in some novel areas.

11 a.m.
Failure to Thrive: The Effect of Vitamin D at Processing
Dr. Steve Henry, Dr. Lisa Tokach and Dr. Megan Potter, Abilene Animal Hospital

Noon
LUNCH - with trade show

Afternoon Program
Master of Ceremonies
Pat Murphy, Assistant Director, K-State Research and Extension

1:30 p.m.
Current K-State Swine Research to Help Improve Net Return of a Swine Business, Continued
K-State Swine Team

2:30 p.m. 
Global Grain and Livestock Outlook: How It Will Impact You!
Mr. Joe Kerns, Risk Assessment and Management
Ames, Iowa

3:30 to 5:00 p.m.
Reception with K-State Ice Cream
Stay around to visit with your fellow pork producers and enjoy some K-State hospitality

To register online, go to www.KSUswine.org


Meat Export Federation News


August Pork Exports Soar to New Heights
 Editor's notes: 
- Export statistics refer to both muscle cuts and variety meat unless otherwise indicated.
- One metric ton = 2,204.622 pounds.

August was another outstanding month for U.S. Pork exports, according to statistics released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Pork exports reached their highest monthly volume of the year at 186,068 metric tons, and the second-highest value total of all time at $531.2 million. Pork exports are on pace to set new value records in 2011.

Pork exports surge in Asia, Canada, Russia, Southern Hemisphere markets
August pork exports were 27 percent higher than a year ago in terms of volume and 44 percent higher in value (surpassed only by the record $553.6 million, set in March 2011). This performance pushed year-to-date exports to nearly 1.44 million metric tons valued at $3.82 billion - an increase of 16 percent in volume and 23 percent in value over last year's pace. August exports equated to 27.3 percent of production with a value of $56.27 per head, compared to 22.4 percent and $40.87 in August 2010. For the year, pork exports equated to 27.3 percent of production with a per head value of $53.98.

August exports to Japan, the leading value market for U.S. Pork, were 28 percent higher than a year ago in volume at 40,887 metric tons and 37 percent higher in value at $168.4 million. For the year, exports to Japan were 13 percent ahead of last year's record pace in terms of volume at 328,353 metric tons and 16 percent higher in value at $1.27 billion.

South Korea continues to be a bright spot for U.S. Pork as August exports more than doubled last year's volume total at 10,268 metric tons and more than tripled the value at $31.2 million. For the year, exports to Korea were 142 percent higher in volume at 146,627 metric tons and 192 percent higher in value at $374.5 million. These totals have already set new full-year records for Korea, topping the previous highs set in 2008 of 133,532 metric tons valued at $284 million.

Exports to China also continued to surge, with a record August volume at 35,636 metric tons pushing this year's volume up 336 percent at 188,622 metric tons to go along with a 237 percent increase in value at $316.8 million. Exports to Canada were up 9 percent in volume at 131,004 metric tons and 14 percent in value at $464.2 million. August export volume to Russia was the second-highest of the year at 8,213 metric tons. Though export volume to Russia at 49,143 metric tons was down about 12 percent for the year, value was up 22 percent to $149.4 million. Another market showing exceptional growth was Australia, up 18 percent for the year in volume at 45,865 metric tons and 39 percent in value to $147.4 million (less than $1 million short of the full-year value record established last year). Exports to Central-South America were up 22 percent to 44,980 metric tons with volume up 33 percent to $113.4 million. Existing trade agreements have assisted exports to this region and ratification of the Colombia and Panama FTAs will foster further growth.

Mexico continues to be the top volume destination for U.S. pork at 344,875 metric tons down 3 percent from last year's record pace. August volume of 44,641 metric tons was steady with last year but up 13 percent from July, and the value of August's exports to Mexico rose more than 10 percent. For the year, export value to Mexico was up 2 percent to just under $654 million.



NPPC News

FOR THE WEEK ENDING Nov. 4, 2011

USDA OFFERS 'NEW' GIPSA RULE
The U.S. Department of Agriculture today sent a scaled-back version of the GIPSA rule to the White House Office of Management and Budget for review. OMB is the last step in the rulemaking process before a rule is finalized. Reports claim that USDA's "new" regulation on buying and selling livestock and poultry includes only provisions that were in the 2008 Farm Bill. Those provisions deal with poultry companies giving reasonable notice to growers prior to suspension of delivery of birds, poultry and swine production contracts that require facilities upgrades, termination of production contracts and the use of arbitration to resolve contract disputes. A provision requiring the terms "undue" or "unreasonable" preference or advantage to be defined apparently was not included in the new regulation. The agency also proposed as an interim final rule a regulation for the poultry industry's tournament pay system. Dropped from latest proposal were provisions that were included in the original GIPSA rule, which was proposed in June 2010, prohibiting packer-to-packer sales and eliminating the need to prove harm to competition to win a case under the Packers and Stockyards Act. NPPC strongly opposed the original GIPSA rule, which, it said, would have been bad for farmers and ranchers, bad for consumers and bad for rural America. NPPC has not seen the "new" GIPSA rule.

SENATE PASSES AGRICULTURE APPROPRIATIONS BILL
The U.S. Senate this week passed a $182 billion agriculture appropriations bill on a vote of 69-30. The bill will fund the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration and related agencies through September 2012. Supported by NPPC, the funding bill includes $7 million for an animal traceability program, which would allow animal health officials to better identify, control and eradicate diseases. Totaling $19.78 billion in overall discretionary spending, the measure contains $138 million less in discretionary spending than the fiscal 2011 bill. The Senate bill, unlike the House bill, does not include language prohibiting USDA from implementing its proposed regulation on the buying and selling of livestock, also referred to as the GIPSA rule. NPPC supports the House language. Because the House and Senate appropriations measures are different, a conference committee of lawmakers from each house must work out those differences. To read the Senate bill, click here.

HEARING HELD ON EPA'S Chesapeake Bay TMDL PLAN
The House Agriculture Subcommittee on Conservation, Energy, and Forestry Wednesday held a public hearing to review the Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Watershed Implementation Plans and their effects on rural communities. The TMDL, referred to as a "pollution diet" by the EPA, is a fixed limit on the quantities of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment that can be released into the Chesapeake Bay. The costly regulatory burdens imposed by the process have caused several states to voice concerns over EPA's model. Agriculture is a top industry in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which spans more than 64,000 square miles and six states. House Agriculture Committee Chairman Frank Lucas, R-Okla., fears the EPA model for the Chesapeake Bay watershed could eventually be implemented in the Mississippi River and the Great Lakes regions.

HOUSE SUBCOMMITTEE APPROVES Farm Dust Bill
The House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power this week approved, 12-9, H.R.1633, the "Farm Dust Regulation Prevention Act of 2011." The bill prohibits the Environmental Protection Agency from modifying regulations on coarse particulate matter, commonly referred to as dust, up to one year following enactment. The legislation would also exempt farm dust that is regulated at the state or local level from federal regulations. Last week, Reps. Kristi Noem, R-S.D., and Robert Hurt, R-Va., testified in favor of the act. More than 100 lawmakers signed onto the bipartisan bill, and more than 100 agricultural organizations, including NPPC, also support the bill.

Russian SPS Barriers Unresolved as IT Moves Toward WTO Membership 
After 18 years, Russia is on track to join the World Trade Organization (WTO) in December. The country is the world's biggest economy that is not a member of the WTO, as well as a potentially large market for U.S. pork products. Although Russia was the sixth most valuable export market for U.S. pork in 2010, worth more than $204 million, U.S. pork sales have fallen nearly 60 percent since 2008. The decline has come about because of Russia's reduced import quota and unscientific sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) restrictions. The Russian export market is characterized by volatility and high risk because of inconsistent application of these unscientific standards. NPPC is concerned that if it is granted membership to the WTO before the SPS issues are resolved, Russia will not have any incentive to adopt science-based standards after it becomes a WTO member. NPPC wants commitments now from Russia on basic WTO disciplines, including recognizing the U.S. plant inspection system as equivalent to its system. NPPC also wants the largest possible tariff rate quota for U.S. pork.

Japan Considering Joining TPP 
Japan is considering joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement, an Asia-Pacific trade agreement that would help expand American exports, saving and creating jobs in the United States. Reports suggest that Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda will make an announcement at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, which will be hosted by President Obama in Honolulu in mid-November. In 2010, the U.S. exported to Japan about 435,000 metric of pork products worth more than $1.6 billion, making Japan the No. 1 value and No. 2 volume market for U.S. pork. The U.S. pork supports TPP and Japan's entry into the trade negotiations. Other nations engaged in the TPP trade talks include Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam.

NPPC ATTENDS MEETING on Animal Health ISSUES
NPPC Chief Veterinarian Liz Wagstrom attended the USDA "Secretary's Advisory Committee on Animal Health" meeting Nov. 1-2 in Washington, D.C. At the meeting, hosted by USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, the committee made several recommendations to USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack on various aspects of the department's animal traceability rule, including affirming the importance of having a workable traceability system. Additionally, the committee heard presentations on foreign animal disease preparedness, vaccine development, research and diagnostics and passed recommendations to the secretary to prioritize these activities.

WHAT'S AHEAD

SUPREME COURT TO HEAR 'FATIGUED' HOG CASE
The U.S. Supreme Court next Wednesday will hear arguments in a case involving a California law that bans non-ambulatory livestock, including hogs, from entering the food supply. The high court has been asked by the National Meat Association to rule that the Federal Meat Inspection Act pre-empts the state statute. The California Legislature approved the law in 2008 after a video was released by the Humane Society of the United States, showing non-ambulatory, or "downed," cows at a California beef packing plant being dragged and prodded to enter the processing line. [It should be noted that the U.S. Department of Agriculture already forbids the slaughter of non-ambulatory cattle for human consumption or other uses.] A federal district court judge blocked the law, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Francisco last year overturned the lower court ruling. NPPC and the American Association of Swine Veterinarians filed a friend-of-the-court brief with the Supreme Court in the case. NPPC has pointed out that, after transport from the farm to the packing plant, hogs can become non-ambulatory from fatigue. With rest, the overwhelming majority of them will walk, and processing them poses no food-safety or public-health risk.



National Pork Board News


Hog Thefts Highlight Need for Farm Security

Swine barns in southern Minnesota have recently become a target for thieves who have stolen hundreds of pigs from at least two farms in Nicollet County and Kandiyohi County. Minnesota law enforcement officials are urging pork producers across the country to step up security measures at their own farms.

"We haven't had much trouble with situations like this before," says Marc Chadderdon, a criminal investigator with the Nicollet County Sheriff's Department, who noted that many of the thefts in his area occurred from Aug. 14 to Sept. 17. "These cases can be tough to investigate, because they often aren't reported right away."

Investigators are attempting to learn the whereabouts of 150 pigs, which were stolen from a farm near Lafayette, Minn. The farm owner told deputies that he had gone in to cull all the market-ready pigs from his barns and found 150 animals missing.

Nicollet County investigators also are working with deputies from Kandiyohi County, where 590 pigs were stolen from a large livestock operation near Lake Lillian on Aug. 15. The value of those pigs is estimated at more than $100,000.

Investigators analyze the crimes
There are a number of similarities in these thefts, said Chadderdon, who notes that the perpetrators appear to be:

• Conducting surveillance. Anyone can go online to Google Earth and pinpoint the location of swine facilities. They also can identify the operations that are the most isolated, says Chadderdon, who also has been in contact with law enforcement officials in Lyon County, Iowa, who alerted him to this possibility.

• Thwarting alarm systems. In the Minnesota break-ins, the vandals cut through the ventilation curtain and bird netting on the side of the barns. "They cut near a post so the entry point wasn't obvious," Chadderdon says. While the Nicollet County farm had an alarm system, it wasn't triggered by this style of break-in.

• Stealing animals that aren't marked or tattooed. In addition, prime targets have been 250- to 275-pound animals that are ready for market. "Whoever is stealing the hogs appears to have some knowledge of the hog industry," Chadderdon says.

• Selling the hogs as quickly as possible. Law enforcement officials suspect that the thieves are probably selling the stolen hogs at auction barns and may be moving 30 to 40 hogs at a time. 

Protect yourself
Since producers make a large investment in their livestock and their farms, it's important to take some simple steps to protect these assets. Specifically, Chadderdon encourages pork producers to:

• Conduct animal counts. Accurate numbers are key. "I know farmers don't like to take the time to do this, but it's the only way to know for sure if you're missing any livestock," Chadderdon says.

• Report suspicious activity. Don't be afraid to contact local law enforcement officials if something seems amiss at your farm. "Also, if someone doesn't normally sell hogs to your auction barn or packing plant, or an existing customer is suddenly selling a lot more hogs than normal, don't be afraid to report it," Chadderdon says. "You can remain anonymous when you call the authorities."

Pork Producers Seek America's Next "Crock-Stars"

Nothing brings families together like a favorite meal, and slow cookers are ideal for preparing hearty, one-pot wonders. To inspire culinary creativity, America's Pork Producers and Good Housekeeping are inviting home cooks to show off their unique twists on classic slow-cooker recipes for a chance to win $2,000 and a six-month supply of pork.

"With the slow cooker and pork, it's so easy to prepare family favorites that get everyone around the table," says Good Housekeeping Food Director Susan Westmoreland, who manages the magazine's test kitchen. "Since pork pairs well with so many flavors, home cooks can experiment with different ingredient combinations to find the next family favorite."

To ignite inspiration for the 2011 slow cooking season, the Pork Checkoff is hosted the second annual "America's Next Pork Crock-Stars" contest. Consumers submitted recipes in one of four categories, including Pork Chili, Soups and Stews; Pulled and Barbeque Pork; Pork Roast; and Pork Inspiration (miscellaneous category). 

Pork fans are voting online to determine the 20 finalists, five in each of the four categories. One finalist in each category will ultimately be crowned one of "America's Next Pork Crock-Stars" by a panel of judges, including Westmoreland and the 2010 Pork Crock-Star winner, Linda Cifuentes.

Contest inspires culinary creativity 
To help spread the word about the contest, Westmoreland participated in an integrated media tour with television broadcasters and online journalists and bloggers. During the media tour, Westmoreland showcased the surprisingly simple,  Asian-style Simmering Pork Shoulder recipe featured in the new Good Housekeeping Test Kitchen Cookbook: Essential Recipes for Every Home Cook.  

This irresistible dish, which is cooked in a fragrant combination of soy sauce, dry sherry, fresh ginger and orange peel, includes pork shoulder, one of many juicy, flavorful pork cuts that can be easily prepared in a slow cooker. "While slow-cooker pork recipes are perfect for any season, they fit exceptionally well during this busy time of year," says Pamela Johnson, director of consumer communication for the Pork Checkoff, who adds that the Pork Checkoff served up even more time-saving pork recipes during National Eat Together Week.

Win free pork via social media 
To celebrate the "America's Next Pork Crock-Stars" contest, the Pork Checkoff is giving away a free slow cooker and $25 worth of pork every day throughout the month of October. Be sure to "like" Facebook.com/PorkBeInspired  and follow @AllAboutPork on Twitter for your chance to be one of the lucky daily winners.  

Pork Checkoff Offers Insight, Tips on Manure Pit Foaming

Reports of pit foaming are by no means a new phenomenon, but fall tends to see more incidences than other times of the year. For that reason, it's prudent for producers and others working around deep-pit manure systems to know how to keep safety as the No. 1 priority when conditions produce foaming.

"Whenever you are about to agitate or remove manure from a deep pit, you need to remove the pigs first, if at all possible, and make sure no one is in the building," says Allan Stokes, Pork Checkoff's director of environmental programs. "It's best to clearly mark entryways to buildings where manure agitation or pump-out is going on by using door tags, such as the free ones offered by the Checkoff through the  Pork Store."

As Stokes makes clear, "Safety must be the first concern for people and animals." With that goal in mind, he offers some additional key steps to help foster safety, including: Maintaining maximum ventilation rates for a period prior to and during agitation and pump-out to help to avoid gas build-up in the building; and shutting off equipment not necessary for manure removal, such as heaters and automatic feed systems, which could provide ignition sources for any gas pockets in the building. 
Stokes also advises producers to be wary of products that claim to "de-foam" pits or make them safer to work around. The Pork Checkoff and others are funding ongoing research into what causes pits to foam. Until the causes are clearly known, it is difficult to determine what will actually work to eliminate pit foaming.
    
In 2009, the Pork Checkoff funded Iowa State University researchers to investigate the causes of pit foaming and the steps producers could take to ensure human and animal safety. Their findings are in the report titled,  Deep Pit Swine Facility Flash Fires and Explosions: Sources, Occurrences, Factors, and Management.

Producers also can download the Checkoff's fact sheet, Safe Manure Removal Policies, or order it through the  Pork Store  at no cost.



KPA Producer Resources

SPCC Compliance Date Extension for Farm

On October 18, 2011, the U.S. EPA amended the date by which farms must prepare or amend and implement their Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plans, to May 10, 2013. If EPA receives no adverse comment by November 2, 2011, then the rule will become effective on November 7, 2011.

An overwhelming segment of the continental United States was affected by flooding during the spring and summer of 2011. Other areas were impacted by devastating fires.  Many counties in many states were declared disaster areas by either the federal or state government or both. As a result, EPA believes that because of their unique nature farms were disproportionately affected and need additional time to prepare and implement a Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan.

The amendment does not remove the regulatory requirement for owners or operators of farms in operation before August 16, 2002, to maintain and continue implementing an SPCC Plan in accordance with the SPCC regulations then in effect. Such farms continue to be required to maintain plans during the interim until the applicable compliance date for amending and implementing the amended Plans. Finally, the amendment does not relieve farms from the liability of any oil spills that occur.

To see more information, click on EPA SPCC Plans

KPA Community Outreach Program 

The Pork Community Outreach is designed to assist individual pork producers in becoming more involved and positively visible in their local communities. The KPA is offering matching funds on the expenses on selected community relations activities. The purpose of this program is to multiply the positive effects of pork producer involvement in the communities where hogs are raised.

To be eligible you must:

Fill out a cost share request form and submit it to the KPA at least two weeks prior to your event and submit design ideas to the KPA so that appropriate logos and messages may be included.

Click on  Community Outreach to download a form.


PQA Plus Site Assessment Rebate Program

The Kansas Pork Association, the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council are encouraging all producers to become PQA Plus certified and achieve PQA Plus Site Status. The purpose of this program is to encourage producers to be proactive in providing the best possible care for their animals and show commitment to the ethical principles of pork production as outlined in the We Care responsible pork initiative.

Having a PQA Plus advisor review your operation can both improve the well-being and productivity of animals in your care by noting changes or additions that may not otherwise be noticed.

The Kansas Pork Association is offering a $100 rebate to Kansas Pork Producers completing a PQA Plus Site Assesment. The funding is available on a first-come-first-serve basis.

The following requirements and stipulations apply:

Click here to download the  rebate form.

Please contact Tim Stroda at kpa@kspork.org or (785) 776-0442 with questions or to see if funds are still available.


KPA Classifieds

The KPA Producer-to-Producer Classified Section is provided free of charge to producers who are looking for a way to advertise to other producers. Contact the KPA office to get your ad listed.



Kansas GOLD Inc. working to update producer's informationKansas GOLD

Garry Keeler, program coordinator for Kansas GOLD Inc., is now working to update the yearly information needed to recertify facilities. Kansas GOLD Inc. will be contacting producers as their certification becomes due. The program has also recently started working with several producers to begin the process of applying for new permits.

The GOLD program is designed to ensure that when a regulator visits your farm, the information they request can be found easily and is packaged in a pre-approved format. The process begins with a visit to your farm by the Kansas GOLD coordinator, who will begin by examining your KDHE permit for each facility number. This permit tells the coordinator what information needs to be collected and kept on file.

Kansas GOLD Inc. provides a cost-effective manner to ensure your operation is in compliance. For information, please click on GOLD or contact the KPA office at (785) 776-0442 or e-mail to kpa@kspork.org

Updated September 23


KPA News

Come join the fun as the KPA grills at the KSU-Missouri Football game

The Kansas Pork Association is teaming with the National Pork Board and Kansas State Athletics on a grilling promotion before the KSU vs. Missouri football game on Saturday, October 8.

The Pork Board's "We Care" trailer will be serving pork samples just outside the southeast gate to the stadium.

Producers who are willing to help with the promotion will receive tickets to the ballgame. Participants must be over 18. Please call 785-776-0442 to sign up for the promotion.






Volunteers needed for Taste of Home Cooking Schools

It's that time of year again! Taste of Home cooking schools are heating up around the state and KPA will be supporting the National Pork Board's nationwide sponsorship of Taste of Home.

In 2010, KPA successfully sponsored Taste of Home Cooking Schools to reach over 4,500 people who cook and wanted new family-friendly recipes. Sponsorship included serving pork loin samples and hosting a booth with recipes, cooking tips and coupons before the 2-hour cooking school.

This fall, KPA will attend three locations of Taste of Home Cooking Schools; Park City at the Hartman Arena on October 14, Salina at the Salina Bicentennial Center on November 2, and Lawrence at the Holiday Inn on November 15. KPA will interact with close to 4,000 home cooks during these three events.

Do you love to cook pork and spread the pork love? If so, contact Jodi at the KPA office and join her at the cooking school - she could always use an extra hand to feed the 1,000+ event attendees!


KPA Leaders host Congresswoman Lynn Jenkins

KPA Chairman Kent Condray, Clifton, along with KPA Executive Board members Alan Haverkamp, Bern, and Ron Suther, Blaine, recently met with Congresswoman Lynn Jenkins and members of her staff at the KPA office.

The producers provided on overview of the pork industry and highlighted its importance to the state's economy.

The group discussed issues important to the pork industry including: free trade agreements, feed availability, the GIPSA rule and the Mexican trucking issue.

"We greatly appreciate the time Congresswoman Jenkins took out of her schedule to meet with our producers. We hope she now has a better understanding of some of the challenges facing the pork industry," Condray said.

Ambassador of Vietnam visits swine unit in Washington County

Brylin Farms and Schwartz Family Farms hosted a visit of Congressman Tim Huelskamp and the Ambassador of Vietnam to the United States, His Excellency Nguyen Quoc Cuong, in Washington, Kansas on August 24. The day began at the Brylin Farm, a swine finishing facility, and concluded at First National Bank in Washington, where the two leaders took part in a working luncheon. Congressman Huelskamp and Ambassador Cuong discussed at great length the prospect of trade between the two nations, which is being negotiated through the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement, a regional agreement among the United States and eight other nations, including Vietnam. Kansas is one of the first states he has visited formally since becoming Ambassador.



"It was a very unique opportunity and special privilege to host His Excellency in America's heartland," Congressman Huelskamp said. "There are great opportunities to increase trade between the United States and Vietnam, and I will work to take down barriers and facilitate that. I am enthusiastic about and proud of Kansas agriculture, and appreciated the opportunity to show off the safe products our great state has to offer to the global marketplace.

"We need trade agreements that reflect the reality of our 21st-Century global economy. We can exchange information across borders so quickly and with great ease; there is no reason why exchanging goods should not be as simple. The majority of the world's consumers live outside the United States' borders, and the government should not stand in the way of American farmers and producers selling their goods to them. Kansas can feed the world, we just need to be allowed to do so."

Other sponsors of the visit included the Kansas Pork Association, Ag Management Services, Frontier Farm Credit, Triumph Foods and First National Bank of Washington.


KPA Pork Chop Open held in Washington

The Annual Pork Chop Open Golf Tournament was held Friday, September 9, at Cedar Hills Golf Course in Washington. With perfect weather and great food, all golfers involved had a great time! 

The tournament included golf enthusiasts from north central and northeast Kansas, as well as southern Nebraska. Delicious pork snacks were prepared by Frontier Farm Credit and the pork loin lunch was provided by Farmland Foods. The players also enjoyed the chance to win $10,000 if they hit a hole-in-one on Hole 7. A few shots got close and a few landed in the pond. 





We would like to thank our sponsors for making this event possible. Sponsors of the event included Bottenberg & Associates, Farmland Foods, Frontier Farm Credit, Kansas GOLD, ZFI Swine Semen Services, National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council. Hole sponsors included Farm Management Services, Farmway Co-Op Inc.,  Fourth and Pomeroy Associates, Inc., Hoovers, Inc, Hydro Engineering, Inc, Kastl-Powell Agency Inc., MetaFarms, Inc., Midwest Livestock Systems, Inc, Olsen's Agriculture Lab, Suther Feeds, Inc, and Tyson Fresh Meats, Inc.

Results from the Tournament were as follows:
Flight 1                  Team Leader                      Score
1                            Jeff Brabec                         55
2                            Garry Keeler                      57
3                            Andy Goeckel                     57                          

Flight 2                  Team Leader                      Score
1                              Barrie Luers                       66
2                              Dan Gerety                        67
3                              Dave Weber                       67

 

Farmland Frontier Farm Credit Kansas GOLD

Pork Checkoff National Pork Producers Council 

Bottenberg & Associates



KSU News

Swine Producers Urged to Guard Against Aflatoxin in Corn


Soaring temperatures and drought conditions through parts of Kansas and other states are sparking some cases of aflatoxin in corn, which means swine producers should be vigilant about what they're feeding, according to Kansas State University scientists.

"Aflatoxin is a toxic metabolite produced by the ear-rotting fungusAspergillus flavus,"  said Doug Jardine, state plant pathology leader with K-State Research and Extension. "It is favored by hot, humid and droughty conditions during the grain fill period."

K-State extension swine specialists Mike Tokach and Joel DeRouchey outlined several points for producers to keep in mind regarding feeding corn to swine.

· Harvest contaminated corn fields as quickly as possible. Once it appears, toxin levels appear to continue to increase in fields due to mold growth.

· Clean the grain if possible, before storage. Removing damaged kernels lowers toxin levels (by about 50 percent).

· Store at less than 15 percent moisture (13 percent or less is ideal) to limit further fungal growth and toxin production.

· Flush to clean the system after handling contaminated corn (put flush in a contaminated bin).

 

· Consider adding propionic acid to corn before it goes into storage if fungus is present and a concern. 0.5 percent addition of propionic acid limits further fungal growth.

· Monitor grain bin temperatures. Good grain management is important, as hot spots will increase fungal growth and toxin production.

· Segregate corn into high and low level bins if possible. Corn with less than 20 parts per billion can be fed in sow, nursery and last finisher diets. Corn with greater than 20 ppb can be fed to finishing pigs.  

· Use low test weight corn quickly. It does not store well.

· Monitor DDGS (dried distillers grains with soluble). Aflatoxin may be four times higher in DDGS than in the corn used to make it

"Keep in mind that aflatoxin is a carcinogen, and that levels build up in the body over time," Tokach said. "So, when feeding corn that contains aflatoxin, there may be reduced feed intake in the short term, but it's the long term where the biggest negative impact can occur."

When feeding in grow finish situations, typically there is no adverse effect if corn contains under 200 ppb aflatoxin, but at 200 to 400 ppb reduced growth can occur and immune systems can be compromised, he said. At 400 to 800 ppb, liver lesions can occur.

When feeding aflatoxin-infected corn to sows, there is typically no effect under 100 ppb, Tokach said. If levels are in the 500 to 750 ppb range, pigs will grow more slowly due to aflatoxin in the sow's milk. There does not appear, however, to be any effect on conception rates.

If feeding infected corn to nursery pigs, there is no effect if the aflatoxin is kept under 20 ppb, he said.  

"Producers who have high aflatoxin corn should use a binder, such as bentonite or aluminosilicate at 10 pounds per ton," DeRouchey said. "Research shows that bentonite will bind up to 700 ppb of aflatoxin. You do not need to add a binder to finishing diets, except last finisher situations, if levels are under 200 ppb."

Even though research shows that higher levels of aflatoxin can be tolerated when bentonite is added to the diet, Food and Drug Administration regulations require that corn fed to young pigs contain less than 20 ppb, for breeding animals less than 100 ppb, and for finishing pigs, less than 200. If the corn has greater than 200 ppb, FDA rules indicate that it should be blended with other corn to lower the level to 200 ppb or less before feeding. Blended corn must be used on-site and cannot be sold.

The swine specialists encouraged producers to use clean corn (less than 20 ppb) for nursery and lactating sows and feed corn with over 20 ppb aflatoxin to finishing pigs.


International Conference on Feed Efficiency in Swine

Where: Hilton Hotel/Qwest Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA
When: November 8th and 9th, 2011.

The International Conference on Feed Efficiency in Swine is being organized as a forum to present the full breadth of knowledge on swine feed efficiency. As such, it will cover topics that range from the influence of feed processing on feed efficiency, or the role of dietary amino acids (or energy) on feed efficiency through to the role of genetic selection on feed efficiency. The program will appeal to anyone involved in the more technical aspects of pork production, including producers, nutritionists, veterinarians, geneticists, etc. The organizing committee invites you to attend this very timely event, held when feed costs are among the highest in memory.

This conference is a joint venture between Iowa State University and Kansas State University. For more infromation, click on www.ans.iastate.edu/ICFES

Kansas State University Swine Day
Thursday, November 17
KSU Alumni Center
Manhattan, Kan

8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Technology trade show

Morning Program
Master of Ceremonies - Dave Nichols, Teaching Coordinator, Animal Sciences and Industry, KSU

9:45 a.m.
Welcome 
Dr. Ken Odde, Department Head, Animal Sciences and Industry, KSU

10 a.m.
Current K-State Swine Research to Help Improve Net Return of a Swine Business
K-State Swine Team will discuss practical application of the latest production research and present breakthroughs in some novel areas.

11 a.m.
Failure to Thrive: The Effect of Vitamin D at Processing
Dr. Steve Henry, Dr. Lisa Tokach and Dr. Megan Potter, Abilene Animal Hospital

Noon
LUNCH - with trade show

Afternoon Program
Master of Ceremonies
Pat Murphy, Assistant Director, K-State Research and Extension

1:30 p.m.
Current K-State Swine Research to Help Improve Net Return of a Swine Business, Continued
K-State Swine Team

2:30 p.m. 
Global Grain and Livestock Outlook: How It Will Impact You!
Mr. Joe Kerns, Risk Assessment and Management
Ames, Iowa

3:30 to 5:00 p.m.
Reception with K-State Ice Cream
Stay around to visit with your fellow pork producers and enjoy some K-State hospitality

To register online, go to www.KSUswine.org


NPPC News

FOR THE WEEK ENDING Sept. 23, 2011

SENATE ACTION CLEARS WAY FOR CONSIDERATION OF FTAS
The Senate this week cleared the way for consideration of the free trade agreements with Colombia, Panama and South Korea by passing legislation to extend the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP), a program that provides duty-free access to the U.S. for developing nations. Under an agreement between congressional leadership and the Obama administration, an amendment to reinstate Trade Adjustment Assistance was attached to the GSP bill. The legislation now goes to the House for a vote. The administration has indicated it soon will be submit the FTAs to Congress. According to Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes, when fully implemented the agreements will increase U.S. pork exports by more than $770 million annually, add more than $11 to the price producers receive for each hog and generate more than 10,000 pork industry jobs. NPPC strongly supports passage of the FTAs.

SMALL BUSINESS COMMITTEE QUESTIONS ADMINISTRATION ABOUT GIPSA RULE
The House Small Business Committee held a hearing Sept. 21 to examine existing and proposed federal regulations that are having or could have a negative effect on jobs, including the U.S. Department of Agriculture's proposal on the buying and selling of livestock and poultry, the GIPSA rule. Titled "Eliminating Job-Sapping Federal Rules through Retrospective Reviews - Oversight of the President's Efforts," the hearing was held to analyze the effectiveness of the Obama administration's Executive Order 13563, "Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review." Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Colo., chairman of the panel's Agriculture, Energy and Trade Subcommittee, questioned Cass Sunstein, administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs of the Office of Management and Budget, on the GIPSA rule. NPPC opposes the GIPSA rule as currently proposed. It has asked USDA to put out for public comment a cost-benefit analyses - now underway - of the regulation; it also has urged the agency to scrap the proposed rule and to write one that sticks to the five issues Congress asked it to address in the 2008 Farm Bill.

PROPOSED CHILD LABOR LAW CHANGES COULD PRECLUDE FARM KIDS FROM MANY JOBS
The U.S. Department of Labor has proposed changes to child labor laws to prohibit agricultural work with animals and to ban work in pesticide handling, timber operations, manure pits and storage bins. It would prohibit youth in agricultural and nonagricultural employment from using electronic devices, including communication equipment, while operating power-driven equipment. It also would prevent children under 18 from being employed in the storing, marketing and transporting of farm product raw materials and bar them from working at grain elevators, grain bins, silos, feed lots, stockyards, livestock exchanges and livestock auctions. The proposal, which would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), would prohibit farm workers under 16 years of age from operating almost all power-driven equipment. A limited exemption would permit some student learners to operate under specified conditions certain farm implements and tractors, when equipped with proper rollover protection and seat belts. The FLSA establishes a minimum age of 18 for hazardous work in nonagricultural employment and 16 in agricultural employment. It provides an exemption for youths employed on farms owned by their parents. The Labor Department is taking comments on the proposal until Nov. 1. To read more about the proposed changes and to submit comments,  click here.

EPA 'GREENHOUSE' GAS REPORTING DEADLINE SEPT. 30 
Hog operations that annually emit more than 25,000 metric tons of CO2 equivalent gases need to file a report with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by Sept. 30. EPA determined that operations with fewer than 34,100 swine would not need to file a report; those with more than that should calculate their emissions but only need to file a report with EPA if they exceed 25,000 metric tons. A rider to EPA's funding bill prohibits the agency from implementing its 2009 greenhouse gas reporting rule, so no guidance on the reporting, which is required under the Clean Air Act, has been issued. Questions about the reporting should be directed to NPPC Chief Environment Counsel Michael Formica at 202-347-3600 orformicam@nppc.org.

USFRA FOOD DIALOGUES ATTEMPT TO CLOSE KNOWLEDGE GAP FROM GATE TO PLATE 
The U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance (USFRA), to which NPPC belongs, Thursday held four town hall-style meetings to discuss how farmers and ranchers raise and produce food, to examine the impact of food on health and the health of the planet and to address consumers' concerns about those issues. The "Food Dialogues" were held in Washington, D.C., New York City, Fair Oaks, Ind., and Davis, Calif. In Washington, the discussion focused on food and farm policy, while in California it revolved around agricultural science and research. In Indiana, the topics included animal care and antibiotics use; in New York City, the discussion focused on obesity, health issues and food choices. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack was interviewed by ABC television journalist Claire Shipman, who moderated the discussion in Washington, about the future of U.S. agriculture. To view the Food Dialogues highlights, visit www.fooddialogues.com.

NPPC MEETS WITH CANADIAN, MEXICAN PORK PRODUCERS GROUPS
NPPC President Doug Wolf, President-Elect R.C. Hunt, Vice President Randy Spronk, CEO Neil Dierks and Vice President and Counsel for International Affairs Nick Giordano met this week in Jasper, Canada, with staff and board leadership from the Canadian Pork Council and the Mexican pork producers organization, the Confederacion de Porcicultores Mexicanos. Among the issues discussed were industry economics and grain availability, animal care, animal health and food safety, and trade.

NPPC NOMINATES CANDIDATES TO EPA SCIENCE ADVISORY BOARD
NPPC this week nominated 14 candidates to a recently formed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board (SAB) to review the data submitted by Purdue University as part of the National Air Emissions Monitoring Study (NAEMS). EPA is seeking nationally recognized experts for the SAB panel with demonstrated expertise and experience in the following areas related to animal feeding operation air emissions estimation methods: air emissions from broiler, dairy, egg layer and/or swine production animal feeding operations; air monitoring and detection methods; exposure assessment; environmental statistics; emission and statistical modeling; and uncertainty analysis. EPA intends to convene the SAB in early 2012 and hold a series of meetings to explore how the agency will interpret the data collected as part of the NAEMS study and the methodological approach it will utilize as it converts the data into useable emission factors to help producers determine their compliance with federal clean air laws. A draft of EPA's methodological approach is expected by the end of the year, with the first meeting of the SAB to take place in late January or early February 2012.

FOR THE WEEK ENDING Sept. 16, 2011

NPPC WANTS ETHANOL INDUSTRY TO BEAR SOME RISKS OF SHORT CORN CROP

NPPC Vice President Randy Spronk, a pork producer from Edgerton, Minn., Wednesday testified on the effects on his operation of tight supplies and high prices of feed grains before the House Committee on Agriculture's Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry. He told members of the panel that over the past year a combination of bad weather and bad policy has created a situation today where producers are questioning whether there will be an adequate supply of feed. Spronk pointed out that the U.S. Department of Agriculture Monday dropped its corn yield estimate to 148.1 bushels an acre, down from 153.0 bushels. Much of the current demand for corn is coming from the ethanol industry, he testified, which this year is expected to overtake livestock and poultry producers as the largest user of corn. The ethanol industry's growth has been driven almost entirely by the federal Renewable Fuels Standard mandate, which makes no provision for short corn supplies, Spronk said. He urged lawmakers to consider policies that will address looming feed grain supply challenges, including:

·         Require the users of corn for ethanol to bear some of the same risks from corn market supply and price shocks that pork producers and others do.

·         Adopt measures to assist livestock and poultry producers who suffer losses because of corn rationing. Even with policy changes designed to deal with the inflexibility in ethanol's demand for corn - i.e., the mandate - other corn users will still bear a disproportionate share of the supply risks associated with weather and other factors.

·         Adopt policies that would fairly and smoothly transition the U.S. ethanol industry to full reliance on the private market for its supply signals and away from the signals provided by the government through the RFS and subsidies.

HOUSE COMMITTEE LOOKS AT 'FLAWED' REGULATIONS, INCLUDING GIPSA RULE

The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Wednesday held a hearing to determine how the Obama administration allowed a number of regulations to go forward despite their negative effects on business and the economy. The committee also issued a report titled "Broken Government: How the Administrative State has Broken President Obama's Promise of Regulatory Reform" that cites 219 economically significant regulations in the pipeline, which if finalized, each will impose costs of $100 million or more annually on the U.S. economy. Among them is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's proposed regulation on the livestock marketing contracts, the GIPSA rule. USDA failed to include a cost-benefit analysis of the rule when it was proposed in June 2010; it subsequently agreed to conduct one. A cost-benefit analysis commissioned by NPPC and other food-animal groups concluded that the rule would result in the loss of more than 23,000 jobs and reduce the annual gross domestic product by $1.6 billion. It would cost the U.S. pork industry nearly $400 million annually. Oversight committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., questioned Cass Sunstein, administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the Office of Management and Budget, which is supposed to review rules before they are finalized, about opening the cost-benefit analysis for public comment, something NPPC and others affected by the GIPSA rule have requested. Sunstein said that it is important for economic analyses "to be available for public review." Issa also expressed concern that parts of the proposed GIPSA rule included issues considered and rejected by Congress in the 2008 Farm Bill. Sunstein said that unless authorized by the underlying statute, regulating beyond congressional intent "is a serious problem." NPPC President Doug Wolf said the hearing reinforced that the rulemaking process for the GIPSA rule was flawed.

GAO REPORT FINDS LITTLE DATA TO LINK ANTIBIOTICS USE, ANTIBIOTICS RESISTANCE

The Government Accountability Office yesterday issued a report that confirmed what the U.S. pork industry has been claiming for years: There is little or inadequate data available to link antibiotic use in food animals with antibiotic resistance in humans. The report, requested by Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-N.Y., who is the author of legislation that would ban the use in livestock of certain antibiotics, found that USDA and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration do such an inadequate a job of tracking the use of livestock antibiotics that officials can't determine the extent antibiotics use is leading to the development of drug-resistance in people. NPPC issued the following statement about the report:

"Not only is there no scientific study linking antibiotic use in food animals to antibiotic resistance in humans, as the U.S. pork industry has continually pointed out, but there isn't even adequate data to conduct a study. The GAO report on antibiotic resistance issued today confirms this, concluding that the limited data collected 'lack crucial details necessary to examine trends and understand the relationship between use and resistance.' The pork industry long has supported the federal antibiotic-resistance monitoring program. Further, pork producers use antibiotics responsibly under veterinary supervision to keep their hogs healthy and to produce safe pork. They follow use and withdraw protocols set by FDA, which approves all animal health products after rigorously testing them to ensure their safety for animals, humans and the environment."

ENORMOUS POTENTIAL FOR U.S. PORK EXPORTS TO CHINA

In a series of presentations, NPPC, in conjunction with the Global Business Dialogue and the U.S.-China Working Group (a bipartisan Congressional group), discussed food price inflation and China's challenges in producing food for its large and increasingly affluent population. China is currently over 98 percent self sufficient in pork production, and pork prices account for 20 percent of China's inflation, which is now over 6 percent. On behalf of NPPC, Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes, presented to agriculture associations, policy institutes, congressional staffers and Administration officials and explained that importing more pork can be a major solution to China's high inflation. Not only will it reduce China's high inflation, but it will also have a significantly positive impact on the U.S. economy. According to Hayes, if China increased U.S. pork imports as a percent of consumption by just 1 percent, the U.S. pork industry would increase sales by $1 billion and would create more than 27,000 U.S. jobs.

PORK PRODUCERS MEET WITH NEW ZEALAND EMBASSY

Montana and Wyoming pork producers, along with NPPC staff, met this week with officials from the New Zealand Embassy to discuss the current pork trade relationship between the United States and New Zealand. New Zealand is currently undergoing a long process to implement its import health standard that will allow 3 kilograms (6.6 pounds) of consumer ready product from the U.S. The producers expressed support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations and the inclusion of New Zealand in a final agreement. However, New Zealand must remove all unscientific barriers and provide full access for U.S. pork into the New Zealand market. NPPC was the first U.S. agricultural group that publically supported the TPP, which now includes nine countries: Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam.



National Pork Board News


Penicillin Deserves Special Attention with New Screening Test
This summer, the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) instituted a new screening test for confirming violative residues of antibiotics. This test is used to confirm residues in animals that were first screened as positive in the in-plant screening tests. This is important to know because the new test appears to be able to confirm some positive screening tests that had before been classified as inconclusive.

The upshot? According to Steve Larsen, director of pork safety for the Pork Checkoff, this may result in animals that would have been considered negative in the previous test sequence now being named positive for a violative residue when the new confirmation test is used.

"Sow packers are especially concerned about penicillin-related violative residues," Larsen said. "Producers need to keep this in mind when administering penicillin products and make sure all administration procedures and withdrawal times are strictly followed."

It's imperative that producers follow several key steps when considering the use of penicillin in their herd if it's an "extra-label" use in swine, including:

• Consult with your veterinarian to ensure penicillin is needed and dosage is established.
• Administer no more than 10 ml of product per injection site.
• Follow all withdrawal times precisely, per the label if used according to label directions, or those of the consulting veterinarian if used in an extra-label manner.

Also, to prevent any residue violations, producers are urged to actively participate in and adhere to the components outlined in the Pork Quality Assurance® Plus program that specifically deal with proper pre-slaughter medication withdrawal periods. And, as always, producers should maintain a robust veterinarian-client-patient relationship to ensure proper medication protocols are followed at all times. 



KPA Producer Resources

KPA Community Outreach Program 

The Pork Community Outreach is designed to assist individual pork producers in becoming more involved and positively visible in their local communities. The KPA is offering matching funds on the expenses on selected community relations activities. The purpose of this program is to multiply the positive effects of pork producer involvement in the communities where hogs are raised.

To be eligible you must:

Fill out a cost share request form and submit it to the KPA at least two weeks prior to your event and submit design ideas to the KPA so that appropriate logos and messages may be included.

Click on  Community Outreach to download a form.


PQA Plus Site Assessment Rebate Program

The Kansas Pork Association, the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council are encouraging all producers to become PQA Plus certified and achieve PQA Plus Site Status. The purpose of this program is to encourage producers to be proactive in providing the best possible care for their animals and show commitment to the ethical principles of pork production as outlined in the We Care responsible pork initiative.

Having a PQA Plus advisor review your operation can both improve the well-being and productivity of animals in your care by noting changes or additions that may not otherwise be noticed.

The Kansas Pork Association is offering a $100 rebate to Kansas Pork Producers completing a PQA Plus Site Assesment. The funding is available on a first-come-first-serve basis.

The following requirements and stipulations apply:

Click here to download the  rebate form.

Please contact Tim Stroda at kpa@kspork.org or (785) 776-0442 with questions or to see if funds are still available.



KPA Classifieds

The KPA Producer-to-Producer Classified Section is provided free of charge to producers who are looking for a way to advertise to other producers. Contact the KPA office to get your ad listed.



Kansas GOLD Inc. working to update producer's informationKansas GOLD

Garry Keeler, program coordinator for Kansas GOLD Inc., is now working to update the yearly information needed to recertify facilities. Kansas GOLD Inc. will be contacting producers as their certification becomes due. The program has also recently started working with several producers to begin the process of applying for new permits.

The GOLD program is designed to ensure that when a regulator visits your farm, the information they request can be found easily and is packaged in a pre-approved format. The process begins with a visit to your farm by the Kansas GOLD coordinator, who will begin by examining your KDHE permit for each facility number. This permit tells the coordinator what information needs to be collected and kept on file.

Kansas GOLD Inc. provides a cost-effective manner to ensure your operation is in compliance. For information, please click on GOLD or contact the KPA office at (785) 776-0442 or e-mail to kpa@kspork.org

Updated July 8


Kansas News

Public Notice by Kansas Pork Producers Council and the National Pork Board

The election of pork producer delegate candidates for the 2012 National Pork Producers (Pork Act) Delegate Body will take place at 1:00 p.m., Monday, July 18, 2011, in conjunction with a Board of Directors meeting of the Kansas Pork Producers Council at the Clarion Hotel, 530 Richards Drive, Manhattan, KS 66502. All Kansas pork producers are invited to attend.

Any producer, who is a resident of the state and has paid all assessments due may be considered as a delegate candidate and/or participate in the election. All eligible producers are encouraged to bring with them a sales receipt proving that hogs were sold in their name and the checkoff deducted. For more information, contact Kansas Pork Producers Council, 2601 Farm Bureau Road, Manhattan, KS, telephone 785/776-0442.


NRCS Announces Additional Funding for Conservation Programs


Eric B. Banks, Kansas State Conservationist for the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), announced that Kansas NRCS recently received additional dollars to fund eligible applications that producers had signed but were not funded earlier this year. There will not be a signup period to collect applications for these additional funds. The funds are used to address resource concerns on tribal and private lands, such as livestock waste, forestland health, grazinglands health, water quality and quantity, organic, and wildlife habitat. 

"Kansas producers have always been known for applying conservation," said Banks. "If you look across the Kansas landscape, producers have installed or implemented many conservation practices to keep their land productive-terraces and waterways and systems such as ag waste and no-till farming to name a few." 

Kansas received the following additional allocations for financial assistance for programs and initiatives: 
• Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) $750,000 
• Lesser Prairie-Chicken Initiative (LPCI) $25,600 
• Ogallala Initiative (OI) $2,500,000 
• Agricultural Water Enhancement Program (AWEP) $1,113,546 
• Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP) $332,000 
• Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) authorized enrollment limited to 2,200 acres 

"These additional funds will continue to help rural Kansans get conservation on the ground," said Banks. "In addition, these dollars and the original allocation bring or sustain jobs and help support the economy of local rural communities." Banks said that the Fiscal Year 2011 initial allocation of over $65.3 million received provided financial assistance for all 2008 Farm Bill programs available in Kansas. 

All NRCS programs are voluntary. These dollars help producers address resource concerns addressed in Kansas with Farm Bill programs. Information Available For more information about NRCS and its programs, stop by your local U.S. Department of Agriculture Service Center or go to the Web site www.ks.nrcs.usda.gov. 



National News

HSUS, United Egg agree on federal standards


Brownfield Ag News

The chairman of the  United Egg Producers says today is an historic moment as the egg industry agrees with the  Humane Society of the United States - to improve the environment of all egg laying hens through enriched cage systems. Until now, the HSUS has called for cage-free egg production. At a news conference this morning, Bob Krouse, a family farmer in Northern Indiana, said their memorandum of understanding with the HSUS - calling for a national standard through federal legislation - is a natural progression of animal agriculture's commitment to animal care.

The agreement calls for increasing the size of cages from 67 inches to 124 inches of enriched cage space over the next 15 to 18 years for all egg laying hens in the U.S.

HSUS president Wayne Pacelle said the unprecedented agreement pushing for a national standard means the HSUS will cease litigation and planned ballot measures in Washington and Oregon. Pacelle says this agreement also means an end to its "undercover videos." He said that it's clear that "the American public supports animal agriculture and it supports animal welfare" and this agreement satisfies both - and it's the "clearest way forward."

Krouse says the UEP is "committed to working together for the good of the hens" in its care. He says "a national standard is far superior than a patchwork of state laws and regulations that would be cumbersome" for their customers and "confusing to consumers."

If passed, the legislation would supersede state laws that have already been passed - in Arizona, California, Michigan and Ohio - requiring increased space and environmental enrichments for egg laying hens.

The UEP estimates the changes will cost producers an estimated 4-Billion dollars and says that will mean increased costs for consumers. But, Krouse says consumers have demonstrated that they are willing to pay more for non-conventionally produced eggs.

 

Statement Of National Pork Producers Council 
President Doug Wolf On UEP-HSUS Push 
For Federal Animal Welfare Law

"First, the U.S. pork industry is committed to animal well-being and continuous improvement in all aspects of pork production.

"But legislation pre-empting state laws on egg production systems would set a dangerous precedent for allowing the federal
government to dictate how livestock and poultry producers raise and care for their animals. It would inject the federal 
government into the marketplace with no measureable benefit to public or animal health and welfare.

"NPPC is gravely concerned that such a one-size-fits-all approach will take away producers' freedom to operate in a way 
that's best for their animals, make it difficult to respond to consumer demands, raise retail meat prices and take away consumer choice, devastate niche producers and, at a time of constrained budgets for agriculture, redirect valuable resources from enhancing food safety and maintaining the competitiveness of U.S. agriculture to regulating on-farm production practices for reasons other than public health and welfare.

"NPPC also is concerned about the uncertainty such legislation would generate among U.S. pork producers, who use a variety of production and housing systems. NPPC supports the right of all producers to choose systems that ensure the well-being of their animals and that are appropriate for their operations.

"The U.S. pork industry has adopted programs - Pork Quality Assurance Plus and Transport Quality Assurance - that educate and certify producers in best practices, and it has adopted "We Care" ethical principles that include producers' commitments to:

"U.S. pork producers have practiced these principles for decades because it's the right thing to do."



NPPC News

FOR THE WEEK ENDING July 8, 2011

MEXICAN TARIFF ON U.S. PORK DROPS BY HALF WITH AGREEMENT
Mexican tariffs on more than $2.4 billion of U.S. goods, including a 5 percent duty on most U.S. pork, 
going into Mexico today were reduced by 50 percent, following the signing Wednesday by the U.S. and 
Mexican governments of an agreement that will allow Mexican trucks to haul goods into the United States. 
NPPC, which led an agriculture coalition urging the United States to live up to its obligation on trucking under 
the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), called the move a "good first step." When the first 
Mexican trucks are allowed - later this summer - to carry products into the United States, the duties will be 
suspended. The agreement resolves the long-standing trucking dispute. The NAFTA trucking provision was 
set to become effective in December 1995, but the United States failed to abide by it. In February 2001, a 
NAFTA dispute-settlement panel ruled that excluding Mexican trucks violated U.S. obligations under the trade 
deal. The ruling gave Mexico the right to retaliate, but the United States delayed the retaliation by implementing 
in September 2007 a pilot program that allowed a limited number of Mexican trucks into America. When in 
March 2009 Congress failed to renew the pilot program, Mexico imposed tariffs on 89 U.S. products. It added 
products, including pork, in August 2010 after the Obama administration failed to present a proposal for resolving 
the trucking dispute. Mexico is the second largest market for the U.S. pork industry, which shipped $986 million of 
pork south of the border in 2010. Since 1993 - the year before NAFTA was implemented - U.S. pork exports to 
Mexico have increased by 780 percent.

SENATE, HOUSE COMMITTEES 'APPROVE' FREE TRADE AGREEMENTS
The Senate Finance and the House Ways and Means committees yesterday held "mock" markups of the free trade 
agreements (FTAs) with Colombia, Panama and South Korea, approving the deals and clearing the way for President 
Obama to submit implementing legislation to Congress. When fully implemented, the FTAs will add more than $11 to 
the price pork producers receive for each hog and generate more than 10,000 U.S. pork industry jobs, according to 
Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes. NPPC strongly supports the three FTAs and has been urging
lawmakers to approve them before Congress begins its August recess.

BIPARTISAN CONCERN ABOUT GIPSA RULE'S IMPACT ON SMALL BUSINESS
Members from both sides of the political aisle of the House Small Business Subcommittee on Agriculture, Energy and 
Trade yesterday expressed concerns about the adverse impact on small business of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's 
proposed regulation on the buying and selling of livestock and poultry - the GIPSA rule. Said Small Business Committee 
Chairman Sam Graves, R-Mo.: "Instituting rules and regulations without investigating the effects on our most robust job 
creators is reckless and completely misguided." USDA Undersecretary of Marketing and Regulatory Programs Edward 
Avalos was a witness at the hearing but avoided answering lawmakers' questions specifically, saying the agency was in the 
midst of finalizing the rule. Robbie LeValley a beef cattle rancher from Hotchkiss, Colo., told the subcommittee that the rule 
"will destroy our small business model, force us to lay off our employees, cripple our ability to market our cattle [the] way 
we want to and limit consumer choice." NPPC is strongly opposed to the proposed GIPSA rule, which would cost the U.S. 
pork industry nearly $400 million annually. It has asked USDA to withdraw the regulation, to write a new rule consistent with the mandate Congress gave it in the 2008 Farm Bill and to complete an economic analysis of any new proposal.

PRODUCER GROUPS OPPOSE SUDSIDIES FOR ETHANOL INFRASTRUCTURE
A coalition of food-animal producer organizations, including NPPC, in a statement released yesterday stated its opposition 
to a "compromise" proposal on ethanol subsidies reached among Sens. Diane Feinstein, D-Calif., Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., 
and John Thune, R-S.D. Under the senators' deal, the tariff on imported ethanol and the ethanol blender's tax credit would 
end immediately - rather than at the end of this year - and "savings" from the tax credit would be used for ethanol infrastructure such as pumps, pipelines and storage facilities. In its statement, the coalition said the money would be better spent on reducing the deficit or encouraging the development of energy sources that do not compete with feed needs.

FEDERAL WELFARE LAW ON EGG PRODUCTION DANGEROUS PRECEDENT, SAYS NPPC
NPPC yesterday expressed concern that federal legislation being pushed by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and the United Egg Producers (UEP) would set a dangerous precedent for allowing the federal government to dictate how livestock and poultry producers raise and care for their animals. It would inject the federal government into the marketplace with no measureable benefit to public or animal health and welfare, said NPPC. HSUS and UEP yesterday announced an agreement between the two organizations on the size of cages for laying hens, moving from UEP's standard of 64 square inches to 124 square inches over 15-18 years. HSUS agreed to stop litigation against and undercover investigations of the egg industry. The groups want the agreement codified in a federal animal welfare law that pre-empts state laws. In a press statement, NPPC said such a one-size-fits-all approach will take away producers' freedom to operate in a way that's best for their animals, make it difficult to respond to consumer demands, raise retail prices and take away consumer choice, devastate niche producers and, at a time of constrained budgets for agriculture, redirect valuable resources from enhancing food safety and maintaining the competitiveness of U.S. agriculture to regulating on-farm production practices for reasons other than public health and welfare. 
To read NPPC's statement, click here.

CODEX FAILS FOR FOURTH YEAR TO APPROVE STANDARD FOR RACTOPAMINE
The U.N.'s Codex Alimentarius Commission, which was established by the U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization and its World Health Organization to promote food safety and fair practices in trade, failed to adopt a science-based standard for ractopamine, a feed additive used to promote leanness in pork and beef. Establishment of a standard will be held at the final stage before approval for the fourth consecutive year. NPPC, which attended the Codex meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, has been working with U.S. government official to get the commission to set a standard for the widely used additive. Ractopamine, like all feed additives, was evaluated and approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and has been approved for use in 26 countries, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Indonesia, Mexico, the Philippines and South Korea. A Codex panel of international scientists, including scientists from the European Union, three times has confirmed the safety of ractopamine and reaffirmed the safety of the product at this week's commission meeting in. Despite those findings and the support of the United States, Canada and countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Pacific Islands for adoption of the standard, opposition from the European Union, China, Thailand and Russia blocked it for non-scientific reasons outside the scope of the Codex. Except for Russia, those countries ban imports of pork from pigs fed ractopamine.

NPPC WORKING TO GET RUSSIA TO ABIDE BY WTO RULES
NPPC is working with the Obama administration to obtain commitments from Russia on issues that will allow more U.S. pork to be exported there before the former Soviet Union is allowed to join the World Trade Organization (WTO). Russia has put in place barriers to pork imports, including sanitary/phytosanitary restrictions and changes to its quotas system. NPPC wants Russia to abide by all WTO trade rules and standards before it joins the WTO. Russia is an important market for the U.S. pork industry, which last year exported $204 million of pork to the country.

WHAT'S AHEAD

ADMINISTRATION'S TOP ANTITRUST OFFICIAL TO RESIGN
Christine Varney, the Assistant Attorney General of the Antitrust Division in the U.S. Department of Justice will step down effective Aug. 5. Varney, who has served in the post since April 2009, is in charge of reviewing company mergers and acquisitions. She took the lead in putting together the joint DOJ-USDA livestock competition workshops that were held last year throughout the country.

HOUSE AGRICUTLURE COMMITTEE CONTINUE TO ASSESS 2008 FARM BILL, USDA PROGRAMS
The House Agriculture Committee will continue assessing the 2008 Farm Bill and existing USDA programs. Hearings next week will focus primarily on crop programs and rural development. 



KPA News

Check out KPA's "Pigging Out and About" Blog

The KPA has launched its first blog "Pigging Out and About". The blog is serving as a consumer restaurant guide and a means to encourage pork consumption. The blog is authored by two Kansas City Barbecue Society judges, Chris Petty and Mike Epler. See the latest post to the blog below.

Williamsburg- Guy and Mae's Tavern

The Tavern

A while back I finally had the pleasure to stop at a place I'd heard a lot about over the years. It had almost become an urban legend in my mind. I was glad to see (and taste) that it actually existed, while managing to live up to the hype. The place is none other than  Guy and Mae's Tavern in Williamsburg, KS. It's known far and wide for serving up delicious pork ribs in a no-frills fashion, and won't disappoint the seeker of all things BBQ!
           
Williamsburg is located a mile or so south of I-35, out between BETO Junction andOttawa (it's about a 20 minute drive from either Ottawa or BETO Junction). You about have to be going there on purpose, or lost, to find the place, but it is well worth your time if you're a rib fan! "Guy and Mae's" is about the only thing going on in Williamsburg anymore, but it continues to pull people in from all over the region, wanting to get a taste of the famous ribs.
           
The Food
As you can see in the picture, the ribs are certainly served up in the most basic fashion. What the picture doesn't show is how they look when they are served. It is a mess of foil that you open up, revealing 2 slices of white bread, with a beautiful slab of ribs under them, and a folded up newspaper under the ribs. It just seems like the way ribs were meant to be served! The ribs were excellent. They were very tender and were about as lean as ribs get. The meat came off the bones and pulled apart almost like you'd expect tender pot roast to do. An added bonus is that the ribs at Guy and Mae's are trimmed to be "St. Louis Style", meaning that the cartilage and sternum are cut off, making them fast and easy to eat. The dry rub provided all the flavor I needed, and it was a good thing. I was not fond of the house BBQ sauce; the only drawback to the entire experience.
           
If you're not in the mood for ribs, you have some other choices, but not many! The menu is basic to say the least. Ribs are the main attraction, but you can get a few other types of smoked meat served in sandwich form. As for sides, you can get a bag of chips, baked beans, potato salad, or cole slaw. Go ahead and get some spicy pickles too, just make sure your drink is handy!



To visit the site see http://piggingout-n-about.blogspot.com/.

Make sure to follow along and tell your friends to follow too!


National News

North American Manure Expo to be held in Norfolk, Nebraska


The only trade show and training event in the world that spreads manure to demonstrate the latest advances in manure management technologies will be July 20 at the Northeast Community College's Agricultural Complex in Norfolk, Nebraska.

The 2011 North American Manure Expo is hosted by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and other land-grant colleges in partnership with Nebraska custom manure applicators and businesses and the Iowa Commercial Nutrient 
Applicators Association.

The annual event travels to a new venue each year and may be a once-ina-lifetime opportunity because it will not return to Nebraska for some time, said Leslie Johnson, project coordinator for the Animal Manure Management workgroup and co-chair for the 2011 expo. Last year it was in State College, PA.

The industry trade show with manure technology demonstrations and many educational events, previously has drawn 1,200-1,500 people from all across the U. S. and Canada. Anyone with an interest in agriculture should plan to attend including livestock producers, manure handlers, consultants and the general public.

Approximately 50 exhibitors from across the U.S. and Canada will display and demonstrate all types and sizes of manure handling equipment including manure and fertilizer spreaders, manure incorporation equipment, GPS equipment for manure application and manure storage options. New this year are sprinkler irrigation systems for manure application. 

Ride-and-drive style demonstrations will be available for those that want to get behind the wheel. All demonstrations will be held (rain or shine) on 40 acres of land adjacent to the complex.

"I've attended two previous expos; both were very different and informative," Johnson said. "This year will be no exception. There's something for everyone, including anyone that is concerned for the environment and wants to 
know how livestock producers are handling manure to avoid water contamination (whether or not they are directly involved with agriculture)."

"Professionalism in Manure Management" is the theme of this year's Expo. Educational topics will include: manure stockpiling, manure pit foaming and safety, center pivots for irrigation of manure and much more.

A panel of crop consultants will discuss how to value and market manure. Attendees can attend a "Manure Pump School" or test their knowledge at a "Manure Scene Investigation". These are just a few of the educational programs that will be offered at the expo, and many of the sessions will be approved for continuing education units for certified crop advisors and others. 

"Regardless of your certification status or size of operation, this is an excellent learning opportunity for anyone who handles manure as a livestock producer or as a custom applicator or hauler," Johnson said.

The expo is open from 7 a.m.-5 p.m. There is no cost to attend. For more information about the North American Manure Expo visit http://manureexpo.org.




National Pork Board News


A Buffet of Pork 

Summer time is the right time for barbecuing, and this summer the Pork Checkoff and Golden Corral are bringing barbecue to the table with an all-you-can-eat style.  

The promotion, "Endless Ribs" kicked-off April 25, continued through July 4 and featured many different pork products.  The buffet boasted baby back ribs, sweet and spicy ribs, pulled pork and pork collars.  Golden Corral has enjoyed the promotion's success so far and are expecting that success to continue.

"Checkoff has been partnering with Golden Corral for about 10 years and has been a great partner for us," Greenblatt said.  "The pork logo is featured in the 15 and 30 second commercials and the TV commercials run all 10 weeks."

In addition to the TV commercials, the logo also was featured on the table tents, window clings and other point-of-sale advertising.  More than 41 million diners will visit the 484 Golden Corral buffets this summer and see the pork logo during the promotion.

The "Endless Ribs" promotion provides new and flavorful dishes to the buffet menu at Golden Corral, serving up not only their "inspiration," but also showing others the pathway to new and creative ways of serving ribs.
  
Pork© Be inspired launched in foodservice 
The Checkoff's foodservice marketing team launched a new foodservice website, www.PorkFoodservice.org  to carry the Pork© Be inspired brand to chefs and other leading foodservice professionals.  With an edgier look and informational content, the easy-to-navigate site features a "Why Pork" sales presentation, business success stories, new product news upcoming events, Pork Checkoff chef programs , a Pork and Beverage Pairing Guide from acclaimed wine expert Rebecca Chapa and a guide to pork quality and popular American hog breeds.
 
The real meat of the site is The 400, an e-newsletter named for the Institutional Meat Purchase Specification number that foodservice professionals use when ordering the whole pig carcass.  The 400 is emailed to the foodservice trade media, marketers, chefs and partners, with timely pork menuing information, chef features, new recipes and updates on food trends.

"Pork is the hot protein now," said Stephen Gerike, director of foodservice marketing for the Pork Checkoff.  "We are conveying that attitude with our website while still delivering the argument for more pork on menus."

New ads supporting Pork Be inspired recently appeared in Food Arts, Restaurant Hospitality, Restaurant Business, Plate, Flavor & the Menu and Chef Magazine.  Another avenue of information flowing to the industry is through banner ads on foodservice websites. 

"From pork's ability to inspire customer loyalty to its potential for helping restaurateurs set their brands apart, pork is on trend and in demand," Gerike said.

 



KPA Producer Resources

KPA works on biosecurity education with Kansas Department of Agriculture's Division of Water Resources

After recent reports of Division of Water Resources personnel visiting multiple farms in one day, KPA staff has provided education to the Division on industry-accepted biosecurity protocols. As part of the process, the Division has agreed to follow protocols for individual farms if the information is provided to the agency.

To ease this process, the KPA has developed a standard form for your use. To download, click on  biosecurity.

Kansas Animal Health Department Facility License

Please remember the rules pertaining to the Kansas Animal Health Department's facility license changed during last year's legislative session. Swine, sheep and goats were separated from cattle. The fees for swine will now be figured on an animal unit basis. Please make sure you received the correct form in your mailing. If not, the form can be downloaded by clicking on  Swine Form.

KPA Community Outreach Program 

The Pork Community Outreach is designed to assist individual pork producers in becoming more involved and positively visible in their local communities. The KPA is offering matching funds on the expenses on selected community relations activities. The purpose of this program is to multiply the positive effects of pork producer involvement in the communities where hogs are raised.

To be eligible you must:

Fill out a cost share request form and submit it to the KPA at least two weeks prior to your event and submit design ideas to the KPA so that appropriate logos and messages may be included.

Click on  Community Outreach to download a form.


PQA Plus Site Assessment Rebate Program

The Kansas Pork Association, the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council are encouraging all producers to become PQA Plus certified and achieve PQA Plus Site Status. The purpose of this program is to encourage producers to be proactive in providing the best possible care for their animals and show commitment to the ethical principles of pork production as outlined in the We Care responsible pork initiative.

Having a PQA Plus advisor review your operation can both improve the well-being and productivity of animals in your care by noting changes or additions that may not otherwise be noticed.

The Kansas Pork Association is offering a $100 rebate to Kansas Pork Producers completing a PQA Plus Site Assesment. The funding is available on a first-come-first-serve basis.

The following requirements and stipulations apply:

Click here to download the  rebate form.

Please contact Tim Stroda at kpa@kspork.org or (785) 776-0442 with questions or to see if funds are still available.



KPA Classifieds

Equipment For Sale

2 stainless Smidley Type B Finishing Feeders. They are 20-hole with a 3,000 pound capacity. $800/each

1-11.25 ton AP bulk bin - like new $1,500

Call 785-617-0043.


The KPA Producer-to-Producer Classified Section is provided free of charge to producers who are looking for a way to advertise to other producers. Contact the KPA office to get your ad listed.



Kansas GOLD Inc. working to update producer's informationKansas GOLD

Garry Keeler, program coordinator for Kansas GOLD Inc., is now working to update the yearly information needed to recertify facilities. Kansas GOLD Inc. will be contacting producers as their certification becomes due. The program has also recently started working with several producers to begin the process of applying for new permits.

The GOLD program is designed to ensure that when a regulator visits your farm, the information they request can be found easily and is packaged in a pre-approved format. The process begins with a visit to your farm by the Kansas GOLD coordinator, who will begin by examining your KDHE permit for each facility number. This permit tells the coordinator what information needs to be collected and kept on file.

Kansas GOLD Inc. provides a cost-effective manner to ensure your operation is in compliance. For information, please click on GOLD or contact the KPA office at (785) 776-0442 or e-mail to kpa@kspork.org

Updated May 25

National News

New USDA Guidelines Lower Pork Cooking Temperature 

New cooking guidelines from the nation's food-safety agency confirm Pork Checkoff research that shows pork can be consumed safely when cooked to an internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit, followed by a three-minute rest time. The guidelines were announced today by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS).

The new recommended temperature is a significant 15 degrees less than what was previously recommended and typically will yield a finished product that is pinker in color than most home cooks are accustomed to.

"Our consumer research has consistently shown that Americans have a tendency to overcook common cuts of pork, resulting in a less-than-optimal eating experience," said Dianne Bettin, a pork producer from Truman, Minn., and chair of the Checkoff's Domestic Marketing Committee. "The new guidelines will help consumers enjoy pork at its most flavorful, juicy - and safe - temperature."

The revised recommendation applies to pork whole-muscle cuts, such as loin, chops and roasts. Ground pork, like all ground meat, should be cooked to 160 degrees Fahrenheit. Regardless of cut or cooking method, both the USDA and National Pork Board recommend using a digital cooking thermometer to ensure an accurate final temperature.

The new recommendation evolved from a 2007 Pork Checkoff-funded research project conducted by Ohio State University to measure consumer eating preferences. As part of that project the university researchers tested how various end-cooking temperatures affected eating preferences. But the researchers needed to know if temperatures below 160 degrees would be safe if that turned out to be consumers' preference.

That question resulted in a Checkoff-funded research project with Exponent Inc., an engineering and scientific consulting firm, to conduct a risk assessment to evaluate any food-safety implications of cooking temperatures within a range of 145-160 degrees Fahrenheit.

The risk assessment found that cooking pork to an internal temperature of 145 degrees was equivalent to cooking pork to 160 degrees. Checkoff-funded research conducted by Texas A&M supports the fact that meat temperature continues to rise after being removed from the heat and the reality that "resting time" between cooking and eating is at least that long.  Therefore, FSIS agreed that the cooking temperature for pork could be lowered.

The USDA guidelines for pork now mirror doneness advice for other meats.

"It's great news that home cooks can now feel confident to enjoy medium-rare pork, like they do with other meats," said Guy Fieri, a chef, restaurateur and host of several food-focused television programs. "Pork cooked to this temperature will be juicy and tender. The foodservice industry has been following this pork cooking standard for nearly 10 years."

The new recommendation reflects advances in both food safety and nutritional content of pork in recent years. On average, most common cuts of pork are 16 percent leaner than 20 years ago, and saturated fat has dropped 27 percent. In fact, pork tenderloin is now as lean as the leanest type of chicken - a skinless chicken breast.

In addition to the new recommendation to cook pork to 145 degrees Fahrenheit, followed by a three-minute rest time, the USDA food preparation guidelines advise the following:


NPPC News

Plan Now to Attend the World's Largest Pork-specific Trade Show


The U.S. pork industry's newest technologies, outstanding breeding stock and educational seminars are just a few reasons to attend the 2011 World Pork Expo. Plans are well underway for this year's event, scheduled for June 8-10 at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines, Iowa.

"Not only is World Pork Expo a must-see for swine-industry enthusiasts, but it also is one of the premier events in Iowa," says Doug Fricke, World Pork Expo show manager. "Hotels rooms already are going fast, so making travel plans early means you won't miss out on the chance to stay at one of the official World Pork Expo hotels."

Each year, nearly 20,000 producers and industry professionals attend Expo, the world's largest pork-specific trade show. Attendees will find business seminars on profitability, animal health and current issues. They can see the newest products, services and technologies offered by more than 450 commercial exhibitors. They will have the opportunity to watch junior showmen and swine breeders exhibit some of the best market hogs and breeding animals available, as they compete for top prizes. And throughout the event, they can feast on great food and enjoy family entertainment.

The Expo trade show is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, June 8, and Thursday, June 9, as well as from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, June 10. The breeding stock sales will continue on Saturday, June 11, from 8 a.m. until they're completed (at approximately noon).

Once again, MusicFest will be the social highlight of World Pork Expo. From 3:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Expo attendees can enjoy roasted pork and refreshments while listening to music performed by live bands.

Several pre-Expo tours are planned so that producers from throughout the world can experience Midwestern agriculture - and hospitality - at its finest. By popular demand, the June 6-7 tour will feature a stop at Cinnamon Ridge Farms in eastern Iowa.

To receive a $10 World Pork Expo early registration discount and free Expo alerts via e-mail, go to www.worldpork.org and click on the "Register Now" tab. The website also has the latest details about room availability at the official Expo hotels in its "Producer" section. Additional information is available when you connect with World Pork Expo on Facebook and follow World Pork Expo on Twitter (hashtag: @NPPCWPX).

World Pork Expo, the world's largest pork-specific trade show, is brought to the entire swine industry by the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC). NPPC is the global voice for the U.S. pork industry, fighting for reasonable legislation and regulations, developing revenue and market opportunities, and protecting producers' livelihoods. For more information, visit NPPC's website at www.nppc.org.

Approve Trade Agreements Now, NPPC Urges

May 24

In a press conference today on Capitol Hill, the National Pork Producers Council urged the Obama administration to send to Congress implementing legislation for and lawmakers to approve the free trade agreements with Colombia, Panama and South Korea.

NPPC joined with the American Farm Bureau Federation, American Soybean Association, National Association of Wheat Growers, National Cattlemen's Beef Association and National Corn Growers Association in calling for action on the FTAs.

"For us to remain a successful and viable industry," said Doug Wolf, NPPC president and pork producer from Lancaster, Wis., "we need new and expanded market access. And the way to get that is through free trade agreements."

For the U.S. pork industry, the deals with Colombia, Panama and South Korea will add more than $11 to the price producers receive for each hog and would generate more than 10,000 jobs, according to Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes.

Wolf also warned about the perils of not approving the trade agreements.

"We need to implement these FTAs now," Wolf said, "because while these deals have languished for more than three years, our competitors have negotiated their own trade agreements with Colombia, Panama and South Korea, and the United States has lost market share in those countries."

Iowa State's Hayes has estimated that the U.S. pork industry would be out of all three markets in 10 years if the United States fails to implement the FTAs and Colombia, Panama and South Korea move forward on trade deals with other nations. The United States would lose thousands of jobs under such a scenario.

"Our industry can't afford that; our country can't afford that," said Wolf.

Exports are vital to the U.S. pork industry, which last year shipped nearly $4.8 billion of pork, an amount that added about $56 to the price producers received for each hog marketed.

In a related matter, Wolf urged Congress to allow to go forward a U.S. Department of Transportation program that will allow Mexican trucks to haul goods into the United States. Mexico has agreed to lift tariffs on $2.4 billion of U.S. goods, including pork, once the program is implemented.


Lawmakers Say Scrap Proposed GIPSA Rule 

May 18

The National Pork Producers Council praised the 147 House lawmakers who today urged U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to withdrawal a proposed rule on buying and selling livestock and poultry and to propose a regulation "more consistent with the intent of Congress outlined in the 2008 Farm Bill."

 The 2008 Farm Bill authorized USDA to promulgate regulations under the Packers and Stockyards Act to address five specific areas related to livestock and poultry contracts. The rule would be administered by USDA's Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration and is known as the GIPSA rule.

 In a bipartisan letter to the secretary, the House members also asked that revisions to the proposed rule and an economic analysis of the regulation be open for public comment "before a final or interim final rule is published." 

 "America's pork producers are grateful to the nearly 150 House members who asked that the proposed GIPSA rule be withdrawn," said NPPC President Doug Wolf, a pork producer from Lancaster, Wis. "As written, the regulation would be bad for producers, bad for consumers and bad for rural America.

 "In writing the GIPSA rule, USDA went well beyond what Congress asked it to do," added Wolf. "And the regulation it came up with will cost the U.S. pork industry nearly $400 million a year, limit farmers' ability to sell animals, dictate the terms of private contracts, make it harder to get farm financing, raise consumer prices and reduce choices, stifle innovation and lead to more vertical integration of the pork industry."

 Said the lawmakers in their letter: "It is troubling that the Department appears to be using the rule-making process to accomplish objectives specifically rejected by Congress, and we are confident any such rule will not be looked upon favorably by Congress."

 NPPC gave particular praise to Reps. Jim Costa, D-Calif., and Reid Ribble, R-Wis., for working to get their colleagues to sign on to the letter to Vilsack.



KPA News

Check out KPA's "Pigging Out and About" Blog

The KPA has launched its first blog "Pigging Out and About". The blog is serving as a consumer restaurant guide and a means to encourage pork consumption. The blog is authored by two Kansas City Barbecue Society judges, Chris Petty and Mike Epler. See the latest post to the blog below.

Bonner Springs- Papa Bob's Bar-Be-Que

Posted 5/19/11

Adam Richman's nemesis. 

Lately, when a person thinks of western Wyandotte County, Cabela's, Nebraska Furniture Mart, the Legends shopping center, and the Kansas Speedway are the first things that come to mind, but if you slightly venture off the beaten path in that area, some very good barbeque awaits. In my latest quest for all things pork, I hit up a place I've visited a few times before, and was always impressed with. The place, "Papa Bob's Bar-Be-Que", is located on the eastern outskirts of Bonner Springs on KS Hwy 32. That's just east of the KS Hwy 7 interchange, or about 15 minutes southwest of the Legends shopping area. Papa Bob's is a neat little place that's home to some excellent Kansas City Style Barbeque, as well as a nearly impossible food challenge that has stumped even the great Adam Richman of Travel Channel's show "Man vs. Food".
Mmmm...
On my most recent stop at Papa Bob's, I had the "Rib Platter", which consisted of an assortment of both long end and short end pork ribs, and the choice of 2 sides. The ribs were delicious; end of story! They were lean, tender, juicy and of course, smoky. They were cooked to near perfection and had just a light coating of Papa Bob's regular BBQ sauce on them, which tasted great. The beans were meaty and tasty, the onion rings were crispy and fresh, and the meal was certainly more than enough food for me!
Note the adult sunglasses and how small they look. 
If that doesn't suit you though, they have an awesome food challenge for anyone brave enough to try it. It's called "The Ultimate Destroyer" and it doesn't appear on the menu. The Ultimate Destroyer is 4.5 lbs of meat on a 12 inch hoagie bun, served with 1.5 lbs of fries, and a pickle. It costs almost 50 bucks and you have 45 minutes to eat everything on the plate. Your prize for finishing it, besides basic pride, is that you get it free and you get to join all of about 4 people on the "wall of fame" that have actually finished it in as a solo act! If you fail, you get proudly displayed on the "wall of shame" instead! The day I stopped in to eat, I was lucky enough to see the sandwich with my own eyes. Unfortunately, it was a group of 3 adult men eating it, so the drama was limited. Nevertheless, the sandwich was a sight to see!
Overall I highly recommend this place for its pork perfection. There's not much I like better than a place off the beaten path that truly looks the part of the classic KC BBQ joint, and then backs up the looks by actually serving authentic KC Style BBQ. Throw in a ridiculous food challenge and an old-school indoor atmosphere and you have a can't-miss place to eat if you're near the Legends region and are looking for something besides the usual suspects of the restaurant world!  
Next on the agenda is something that we've both been waiting on. Remember how we said we would work with the Kansas Pork Producers to provide you with a summer grill giveaway? It's here! Just give the picture below a click and get signed up between today and June 15 for your chance to win a Weber Genesis e-320 Gas Grill  .  Oh, and by the way, make sure to tell a pork producer thank you the next time you see him!
Click here!

 



To visit the site see http://piggingout-n-about.blogspot.com/.

Make sure to follow along and tell your friends to follow too!


 

National News

North American Manure Expo to be held in Norfolk, Nebraska


The only trade show and training event in the world that spreads manure to demonstrate the latest advances in manure management technologies will be July 20 at the Northeast Community College's Agricultural Complex in Norfolk, Nebraska.

The 2011 North American Manure Expo is hosted by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and other land-grant colleges in partnership with Nebraska custom manure applicators and businesses and the Iowa Commercial Nutrient 
Applicators Association.

The annual event travels to a new venue each year and may be a once-ina-lifetime opportunity because it will not return to Nebraska for some time, said Leslie Johnson, project coordinator for the Animal Manure Management workgroup and co-chair for the 2011 expo. Last year it was in State College, PA.

The industry trade show with manure technology demonstrations and many educational events, previously has drawn 1,200-1,500 people from all across the U. S. and Canada. Anyone with an interest in agriculture should plan to attend including livestock producers, manure handlers, consultants and the general public.

Approximately 50 exhibitors from across the U.S. and Canada will display and demonstrate all types and sizes of manure handling equipment including manure and fertilizer spreaders, manure incorporation equipment, GPS equipment for manure application and manure storage options. New this year are sprinkler irrigation systems for manure application. 

Ride-and-drive style demonstrations will be available for those that want to get behind the wheel. All demonstrations will be held (rain or shine) on 40 acres of land adjacent to the complex.

"I've attended two previous expos; both were very different and informative," Johnson said. "This year will be no exception. There's something for everyone, including anyone that is concerned for the environment and wants to 
know how livestock producers are handling manure to avoid water contamination (whether or not they are directly involved with agriculture)."

"Professionalism in Manure Management" is the theme of this year's Expo. Educational topics will include: manure stockpiling, manure pit foaming and safety, center pivots for irrigation of manure and much more.

A panel of crop consultants will discuss how to value and market manure. Attendees can attend a "Manure Pump School" or test their knowledge at a "Manure Scene Investigation". These are just a few of the educational programs that will be offered at the expo, and many of the sessions will be approved for continuing education units for certified crop advisors and others. 

"Regardless of your certification status or size of operation, this is an excellent learning opportunity for anyone who handles manure as a livestock producer or as a custom applicator or hauler," Johnson said.

The expo is open from 7 a.m.-5 p.m. There is no cost to attend. For more information about the North American Manure Expo visit http://manureexpo.org.




National Pork Board News


Pork Checkoff Presents PORK Academy at World Pork Expo 

The Pork Checkoff is sponsoring Producers Opportunity for Revenue and Knowledge (PORK) Academy June 8 and 9 during World Pork Expo at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines. Expo continues through noon on June 10. 

PORK Academy is a series of seminars designed to inform pork producers about current industry challenges in a way that will help them on their own operations.  The seminars feature a variety of topics, including nutrition labeling, carbon footprint, finance, herd health and market outlooks.

"All producers attending World Pork Expo are welcome to join use for the PORK Academy seminars," said Mary Langhorst, chair of the Pork Checkoff's Producer and State Services Committee.  "These seminars are a great way to get accurate information in areas that are vital to our operations."

Below is the PORK Academy agenda. All sessions are in the Varied Industries Building, Room C, including a business seminar luncheon on the upper level:

Wednesday, June 8

Thursday, June 9

"The seminars are not only designed to provide producers with information they can use on their farm, but by hosting these seminars during World Pork Expo, it gives producers time to explore other opportunities at Expo," Langhorst said. 
In addition to PORK Academy, the Pork Checkoff is sponsoring other activities at World Pork Expo. Pork producers are invited to visit the Pork Checkoff hospitality tent outside the northwest corner of the Varied Industries Building and learn more about the new Pork® Be inspiredsm  campaign. National Pork Board members and staff will be serving breakfast burritos in the morning, showcasing new foodservice and retail products and visiting with producers throughout the day. Inside the Varied Industries Building, pork producers can visit the Pork Checkoff booth to learn how the Checkoff is focused on supporting producers. Checkoff staff also will be serving breakfast and lunch to exhibitors and visitors to the Swine Barn on Thursday and Friday.

Information about PORK Academy is available at pork.org, or by contacting Sharlotte Peterson, speterson@pork.org, 515-223-2600.

 



KPA Producer Resources

KPA works on biosecurity education with Kansas Department of Agriculture's Division of Water Resources

After recent reports of Division of Water Resources personnel visiting multiple farms in one day, KPA staff has provided education to the Division on industry-accepted biosecurity protocols. As part of the process, the Division has agreed to follow protocols for individual farms if the information is provided to the agency.

To ease this process, the KPA has developed a standard form for your use. To download, click on  biosecurity.

Kansas Animal Health Department Facility License

Please remember the rules pertaining to the Kansas Animal Health Department's facility license changed during last year's legislative session. Swine, sheep and goats were separated from cattle. The fees for swine will now be figured on an animal unit basis. Please make sure you received the correct form in your mailing. If not, the form can be downloaded by clicking on  Swine Form.

KPA Community Outreach Program 

The Pork Community Outreach is designed to assist individual pork producers in becoming more involved and positively visible in their local communities. The KPA is offering matching funds on the expenses on selected community relations activities. The purpose of this program is to multiply the positive effects of pork producer involvement in the communities where hogs are raised.

To be eligible you must:

Fill out a cost share request form and submit it to the KPA at least two weeks prior to your event and submit design ideas to the KPA so that appropriate logos and messages may be included.

Click on  Community Outreach to download a form.


PQA Plus Site Assessment Rebate Program

The Kansas Pork Association, the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council are encouraging all producers to become PQA Plus certified and achieve PQA Plus Site Status. The purpose of this program is to encourage producers to be proactive in providing the best possible care for their animals and show commitment to the ethical principles of pork production as outlined in the We Care responsible pork initiative.

Having a PQA Plus advisor review your operation can both improve the well-being and productivity of animals in your care by noting changes or additions that may not otherwise be noticed.

The Kansas Pork Association is offering a $100 rebate to Kansas Pork Producers completing a PQA Plus Site Assesment. The funding is available on a first-come-first-serve basis.

The following requirements and stipulations apply:

Click here to download the  rebate form.

Please contact Tim Stroda at kpa@kspork.org or (785) 776-0442 with questions or to see if funds are still available.



KPA Classifieds

Equipment For Sale

2 stainless Smidley Type B Finishing Feeders. They are 20-hole with a 3,000 pound capacity. $800/each

1-11.25 ton AP bulk bin - like new $1,500

Call 785-617-0043.


The KPA Producer-to-Producer Classified Section is provided free of charge to producers who are looking for a way to advertise to other producers. Contact the KPA office to get your ad listed.



Kansas GOLD Inc. working to update producer's informationKansas GOLD

Garry Keeler, program coordinator for Kansas GOLD Inc., is now working to update the yearly information needed to recertify facilities. Kansas GOLD Inc. will be contacting producers as their certification becomes due. The program has also recently started working with several producers to begin the process of applying for new permits.

The GOLD program is designed to ensure that when a regulator visits your farm, the information they request can be found easily and is packaged in a pre-approved format. The process begins with a visit to your farm by the Kansas GOLD coordinator, who will begin by examining your KDHE permit for each facility number. This permit tells the coordinator what information needs to be collected and kept on file.

Kansas GOLD Inc. provides a cost-effective manner to ensure your operation is in compliance. For information, please click on GOLD or contact the KPA office at (785) 776-0442 or e-mail to kpa@kspork.org

Updated March 4

New National Pork Board Campaign Evolves To Celebrate Proud New Brand Identity: Pork® Be inspiredsm
Updated Positioning Creates New Role for The Other White Meat®


With a new focus on reaching creative, flavor-seeking home cooks who already prepare, eat and love pork, the National Pork Board today announced a new branding position celebrating pork's ability to offer a wide range of options in the kitchen.  With PORK® now as the brand, the new campaign of: Pork® Be inspiredsm shows pork's place in almost any menu, day part, cuisine and lifestyle, based on pork's unique combination of flavor and versatility as the source of kitchen inspiration.


The new, fully integrated campaign features an updated look and feel, along with a new consumer target: the more than 82 million Americans who already cook, eat and love pork. Moving from a functional to a more emotional positioning, the campaign voice is proud, energetic, approachable and unapologetically optimistic about the unique attributes of the world's most popular protein.


Evoking the taste of backyard barbeques, new and attainable flavor combinations or mid-week meals on the go, the bold product imagery celebrates one juicy, tender, flavorful pork meal after another.


"Our research shows that pork's top consumers are looking for more than basic education; they're looking for inspiration. With its great taste and versatility, pork is the ideal catalyst to inspire great meals," said Ceci Snyder, vice president of domestic marketing for the National Pork Board. "While our new target represents our biggest fans, we believe they have the potential and desire to enjoy pork more often - and to inspire others to do the same."


"We produce pork and are proud of it," said Dianne Bettin, chair of the Domestic Marketing Committee and a producer from Truman, Minn. "Pork Be inspired will celebrate the wide range of meals that pork offers, give new ideas to our new consumer target and influencers and move the needle on pork sales both at retail and foodservice."


The new campaign rolls out this March and April, and includes national advertising, public relations, social media, retail and foodservice marketing, as well as activation by state pork associations. Enthusiastic about this renewed approach, 2011 advertising media spending has more than doubled that of recent years. All elements will showcase inspiring new ways to enjoy pork more frequently, with a range of meal and menu options, Snyder said.



Rallying "Pork Champions"
Recent consumer segmentation research from the National Pork Board found that 82 million Americans are "Pork Champions" - men and women who are predominantly medium to heavy fresh pork eaters with a strong passion for pork that they are eager to share. This group of "flavor-seeking creatives:"

A New Role for The Other White Meat® Campaign
Nearly 25 years ago, the Pork® The Other White Meat® campaign was conceived to reposition pork as a healthful protein source. Today, Pork Be inspired goes beyond basic cooking education and health to promote a deeper, more personal level of engagement with existing pork consumers, Snyder said.  However, The Other White Meat campaign will play a role as a heritage brand, with use on the consumer web site and in nutrition communications.  The Other White Meat campaign will not be featured in advertising. 

"Our new campaign communicates to the legion of pork fans that pork is delicious, versatile and can stand on its own," added Snyder. "Pork is what consumers write on their shopping list or order in a restaurant.  To those that love pork, it requires no comparison to the other meats.  The range of meals drives new ideas - and appetites - for pork."

Digital advertising starts March 7 with paid search and web sites that reach the National Pork Board's new target, with creative directing to a new website URL, www.PorkBeInspired.com .  Starting April 11, national television advertising includes both network and cable.   Print advertising begins in April in food and lifestyle publications, using a unique three-page, consecutive right-hand pages to communicate pork's ability to inspire numerous meal ideas.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Winner of Wendell Moyer Student Enrichment Grant Announced

In 1956, Wendell Moyer helped organize a small group of pork producers into the Kansas Swine Improvement Association. Their purpose was to work together to make their business more profitable while keeping the swine industry healthy and flourishing statewide. The KPA is working everyday to achieve this same goal.

To encourage participation in pork production while building our leaders of tomorrow, KSU students who had completed between 25-100 credit hours were eligible to apply for a $1,000 Wendell Moyer Student Enrichment Grant.
The KPA would like to congratulate Alexandra Rath, the recipient of the this grant for 2011. Rath is currently attending Kansas State University for an undergraduate degree in Animal Sciences and Industry with a Biotechnology option. She began her experience in the swine industry during a summer internship with Progressive Swine Technologies and Danbred. While there, Rath worked in the farrowing department at the nucleus farm completing paperwork, processing litters and assisting the geneticist on a research project. The project analyzed the effects of birth weight on pig loss, weaning and finishing weights.

Recently, Rath began working at the Kansas State Swine Research Lab where she tests feed particle size, works at the hog unit and assists graduate students with their research projects.

"One of the most interesting research projects that I have begun work on is using bomb calorimetry in order to determine energy use from dried fecal matter. Other research projects that I will have the chance to work on will include color tests of meat to determine meat quality, several different weight trials, and alternative euthanization methods for pigs," stated Rath in her application.



After graduation, Rath plans to attend graduate school and study Swine Nutrition. "One of the main reasons that I want to pursue a career in the pork industry has been my Dad's heavy involvement with the industry at his job. I am excited that there seems to be so many options available to work with pigs and different career paths open to me," stated Rath.
We thank all of our applicants for demonstrating an interest in the 2011 Kansas Pork Association Wendell Moyer Scholarship and we encourage you to reapply next year. We're grateful to have such outstanding youth with an interest in our industry.



Kansas Regulatory News


Southwest Kansas Surface Water Meter Order
On Feb. 3, Chief Engineer David Barfield issued an orderThe preceding link will open in a new browser tab or window. requiring installation of water flowmeters on surface water right points of diversion within the boundaries of Groundwater Management District Nos. 1, 3, and 5.

Owners of surface water rights in the affected areas have until Dec. 31, 2011 to comply with the requirements of the meter order.  If a meter is already installed for any affected water right, the owner is responsible for submitting a meter installation report formThe preceding link will open in a new browser tab or window. to DWR by April 1, 2011.

The purpose of requiring the installation of meters is to facilitate the need for increased water management and to promote the efficient use of water in the area.  Most areas in Kansas are already required to have meters.

It is understood that many surface water diversions in the western portions of the state are no longer in regular use because of a lack of water.  DWR staff will perform field visits to authorized pump sites in order to determine whether or not a meter is installed.  If no meter is found, for whatever reason, then DWR will issue an order requiring any diversion of water for non-domestic uses to cease until a meter is installed and the installation is verified by staff from our Garden City field office or Stafford field office.


Check out KPA's "Pigging Out and About" Blog

The KPA has launched its first blog "Pigging Out and About". The blog is serving as a consumer restaurant guide and a means to encourage pork consumption. The blog is authored by two Kansas City Barbecue Society judges, Chris Petty and Mike Epler.

The latest post features Coffee Rules in Hays.

To visit the site see http://piggingout-n-about.blogspot.com/.

Make sure to follow along and tell your friends to follow too!



NPPC News

FOR THE WEEK ENDING March 4, 2011

U.S., MEXICO REACH DEAL ON TRUCKING DISPUTE
The Obama administration yesterday announced an agreement in principle with Mexico to resolve a trade impasse over allowing Mexican trucks to haul goods into the United States. The trucking dispute prompted Mexico to place tariffs on a host of U.S. products, including pork. In August, Mexico put a 5 percent tariff on U.S. bone-in hams - a big export item - and 20 percent on cooked pork skins in retaliation for the United States not complying with the trucking provision of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The provision was supposed to become effective in December 1995. NPPC has been urging the Obama administration to resolve as quickly as possible the trucking issue, which erupted in March 2009 when Mexico placed higher tariffs on an estimated $2.4 billion of U.S. goods after the U.S. Congress cut off funding to renew a pilot program that let a limited number of Mexican trucking companies to haul freight beyond a 25-mile U.S. commercial zone. NPPC cautioned that the issue won't be completely resolved until the United States is in full compliance with its NAFTA obligation on trucking. Mexico has agreed to suspend its retaliatory tariffs. Opponents of the NAFTA trucking provision claim there are safety issues with Mexican trucks, but available data, including data collected as part of the pilot program, demonstrate the safety of Mexican trucks, which must meet U.S. standards. Mexico is the second largest market for the U.S. pork industry, which shipped $986 million of pork south of the border in 2010. Since 1993 - the year before NAFTA was implemented - U.S. pork exports to Mexico have increased by 780 percent.

NPPC ASKS PRODUCERS TO TAKE ACTION AGAINST FSIS RULE
NPPC is urging pork producers to submit comments in opposition to a petition from Farm Sanctuary, requesting that all non-ambulatory livestock be banned from slaughter. Currently, federal regulations prohibit beef cattle that become non-ambulatory from entering the food supply. The comments must be submitted by April 8 to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS). The petition, which, according to NPPC, is based on out-dated non-compliance records and assumes that all non-ambulatory animals pose risks to human health, wants FSIS to change its inspection regulations. Click here for more information about the petition and to submit comments.

STABENOW TO LOOK AT EPA REGULATIONS
NPPC this week applauded Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., for saying she will work with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency to address livestock producers' concerns over environmental regulations. In a speech last week, Stabenow, the new chair of the Senate Agriculture Committee, said she's establishing a working group with the two agencies to find solutions to concerns of growers and ranchers. NPPC said it will work with Stabenow to address producers' concerns. In her comments, Stabenow cited one example of a possible regulatory action dealing with more stringent control of farm dust. "We might need to remind [EPA] that country roads can sometimes be a little dusty, and there's not much we can do to change that," she said. Pork producers have taken extensive steps over the past 15 years to better manage their animals' manure for optimum use in crop production and minimize the loss of nutrients into rivers and streams. NPPC worked with EPA on a 2008 Clean Water Act regulation that set a zero-discharge standard for pork operations and more recently participated in a two-year EPA study of air emissions from farms. Data from the study will be used to develop science-based emissions standards for agriculture.

FAS OFFICIAL ADDRESSES PORK PRODUCERS
Janet Nuzum, associate administrator for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Foreign Agricultural Service, today laid out the Obama administration's trade agenda for pork producers attending NPPC's annual meeting in Phoenix. She said the top priority is getting approved by Congress pending free trade agreements with Colombia, Panama and South Korea. She also discussed the president's National Export Initiative, the goal of which is to double exports over the next five years and the key to which is passage of the FTAs.

MERC AWARDS PORK INDUSTRY SCHOLARSHIPS
The Chicago Mercantile Exchange today at the annual business meeting of NPPC - the National Pork Industry Forum - awarded scholarships to four college students who intend to pursue careers in the pork industry. NPPC administers the scholarship selection process. The winners of the $2,500 Lois Britt Memorial Pork Industry Scholarships - named after the late NPPC vice president from Mt. Olive, N.C. - are:

This is the 21st year of the CME scholarship program, which recognizes outstanding youth in the pork community. To be eligible, students must be undergraduates in a two-year swine program or a four-year college of agriculture, provide a brief letter describing their expected role in the pork industry, write an essay on an issue affecting the pork industry and submit two letters of reference from professors or industry professionals.



National Pork Board News


Twitter Party CelebratesTenderloin Tuesday
Tweets came in at a fast, furious pace during the Pork Checkoff's latest Twitter party, and fans' love for pork during "Tenderloin Tuesday" was overwhelming.

"Everyone was excited to give shout outs to their favorite pork cut and preparation tips," says Kristina Vanni, the party hostess and creator of the $5,000 winning recipe for "America's Next Pork Personality Contest" in 2009. "There was so much chatter, I had to refresh my page every few seconds just to keep up."
Participants had the chance to win prizes by answering five different questions about pork's role in a healthy diet. All the trivia answers, along with pork-inspired Super Bowl snack ideas, were available on TheOtherWhiteMeat.com, which helped drive traffic to the site.

"This was our third Twitter party, and it was great success, with more than 1,125 tweets reaching more than two million people," says Cathy Lee Fredrickson, online content manager for the Pork Checkoff. In addition, 135 people participated throughout the hour-long Twitter party, which helped generate more than 100 new @AllAboutPork followers.

Twitter provides real-time feedback
Through her Twitter handle @BetterRecipes and The Other White Meat's Twitter handle @AllAboutPork, Vanni helped keep the conversation rolling throughout the party and spread her love for all things pork through the "Twitterverse."

"Using social media is such a unique way to interact with fans," says Vanni, who notes that pork's versatility opens up a world of possibilities for great dishes. "You can get real-time feedback from consumers and understand what home cooks across the country, and even the world, are looking for when they make mealtime decisions." 

Many Twitter party participants were surprised to learn that ounce for ounce, pork tenderloin is as lean as a skinless chicken breast, and increasing the amount of lean pork in the diet can help manage hunger. Party-goers' comments included 
·         "I am really thinking I'll be at the store tomorrow buying a nice piece of pork."
·         "I now know that eating pork can make you feel fuller longer--that's cool! Thanks for the info."
·         "I have already bookmarked TheOtherWhiteMeat.com. Been going through some recipes."
·         "I love that I can eat and have fun during the Super Bowl without blowing my diet! Thanks."
·         "Definitely considering those Game Day Pork and Chile Wraps! YUM!!"

Another #TenderloinTues party is planned for March 22, 2011, to showcase more mealtime solutions with lean pork. "Pork is a healthy choice, and it's something I can feel good about encouraging others to enjoy," Vanni says.

Ag Advocates Lead Out Loud
When you do a common thing in an uncommon way, you will command the attention of the world, noted American scientist George Washington Carver. It's this motivation that's helping producers and agriculture advocates share the pork industry's story on a neighbor-to-neighbor level through Operation Main Street (OMS).

"I enjoy it, and it's rewarding to walk away feeling like you made a difference," says Carrie Pollard, an OMS speaker who grew up on a swine farm and now farms with her husband near Rockford, Ill.

Since she can travel to the Chicago suburbs and back over a lunch hour, Pollard feels fortunate to be able to share agriculture's story with urban audiences. "I had a suburban business person ask me what she could do for us, and it was a great feeling of support." Pollard isn't alone in her willingness to speak up for the pork industry. Through the end of December 2010, nearly 800 people had completed OMS training classes, and more than 4,200 OMS presentations were scheduled through year-end 2010.

Through Dec. 31, 2010, 68 OMS 1.0 speakers had completed OMS 2.0 training. These leaders are taking the pork industry's message to key influencers like government officials, economic development organizations, dietetic associations and other decision makers.


Volunteer hours for training and speaking through Dec. 31, 2010, totaled 26,360 hours. "That's the annual equivalent of more than 12 full-time employees," says Ernie Barnes, director of industry services for the Pork Checkoff, who adds that OMS speakers' efforts haven't gone unnoticed. He cites the success of the OMS Media Outreach Program, which is designed to generate positive pork industry stories in communities where OMS speakers present.

OMS stories have aired on 208 radio stations resulting in an audience reach of more than 4 million. OMS stories have also run on 24 television stations, resulting in an audience reach of more than 8.4 million households.

 

If you are interested in becoming an OMS speaker, contact Jodi at the Kpa office.


Meat Export Federation News

Year-End Export Results Confirm Strong Year for U.S. Pork


December statistics released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) confirm that pork export value posted the second-best year on record at $4.78 billion, falling just 2 percent short of the 2008 high and besting 2009 by more than 10 percent. Total volume was 1.918 million metric tons - an increase of 3 percent over the previous year.
U.S. pork exports posted the best value year ever in Japan, reaching $1.65 billion. This was the third consecutive year in which exports to Japan exceeded $1.5 billion, with value jumping 7 percent over 2009 and 6 percent over the previous record in 2008. Volume was 434,923 metric tons - an increase of 3 percent over the previous year.
Pork exports have never broken the $1 billion mark for a single year in any market other than Japan, but came very close in 2010. Exports to Mexico reached a record $986.7 million - an increase of nearly 30 percent over the previous high set in 2009. Volume was up 8 percent over the previous year to 545,732 metric tons.
Export volume per head of slaughter equated to $43.72 compared to $38.44 in 2009. The ratio of total production exported was 23.7 percent compared to 22.5 percent in 2009.
Other market highlights for U.S. pork include:

Exports to the Caribbean also posted a record-breaking performance, increasing 6 percent in volume or 42,797 metric tons and 19 percent in value at $92.6 million.

Editor's notes: 
·     Unless otherwise indicated, export results include both muscle cuts and variety meat 
·     One metric ton = 2,204.622 pounds


KPA Producer Resources

KPA works on biosecurity education with Kansas Department of Agriculture's Division of Water Resources

After recent reports of Division of Water Resources personnel visiting multiple farms in one day, KPA staff has provided education to the Division on industry-accepted biosecurity protocols. As part of the process, the Division has agreed to follow protocols for individual farms if the information is provided to the agency.

To ease this process, the KPA has developed a standard form for your use. To download, click on biosecurity.

Kansas Animal Health Department Facility License

Please remember the rules pertaining to the Kansas Animal Health Department's facility license changed during las year's legislative session. Swine, sheep and goats were separated from cattle. The fees for swine will now be figured on an animal unit basis. Please make sure you received the correct form in your mailing. If not, the form can be downloaded by clicking on Swine Form.

KPA Community Outreach Program

The Pork Community Outreach is designed to assist individual pork producers in becoming more involved and positively visible in their local communities. The KPA is offering matching funds on the expenses on selected community relations activities. The purpose of this program is to multiply the positive effects of pork producer involvement in the communities where hogs are raised.

To be eligible you must:

Fill out a cost share request form and submit it to the KPA at least two weeks prior to your event and submit design ideas to the KPA so that appropriate logos and messages may be included.

Click on Community Outreach to download a form.


PQA Plus Site Assessment Rebate Program

The Kansas Pork Association, the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council are encouraging all producers to become PQA Plus certified and achieve PQA Plus Site Status. The purpose of this program is to encourage producers to be proactive in providing the best possible care for their animals and show commitment to the ethical principles of pork production as outlined in the We Care responsible pork initiative.

Having a PQA Plus advisor review your operation can both improve the well-being and productivity of animals in your care by noting changes or additions that may not otherwise be noticed.

The Kansas Pork Association is offering a $100 rebate to Kansas Pork Producers completing a PQA Plus Site Assesment. The funding is available on a first-come-first-serve basis.

The following requirements and stipulations apply:

Click here to download the rebate form.

Please contact Tim Stroda at kpa@kspork.org or (785) 776-0442 with questions or to see if funds are still available.



Kansas GOLD Inc. working to update producer's information Kansas GOLD

Garry Keeler, program coordinator for Kansas GOLD Inc., is now working to update the yearly information needed to recertify facilities. Kansas GOLD Inc. will be contacting producers as their certification becomes due. The program has also recently started working with several producers to begin the process of applying for new permits.

The GOLD program is designed to ensure that when a regulator visits your farm, the information they request can be found easily and is packaged in a pre-approved format. The process begins with a visit to your farm by the Kansas GOLD coordinator, who will begin by examining your KDHE permit for each facility number. This permit tells the coordinator what information needs to be collected and kept on file.

Kansas GOLD Inc. provides a cost-effective manner to ensure your operation is in compliance. For information, please click on GOLD or contact the KPA office at (785) 776-0442 or e-mail to kpa@kspork.org

 

Updated January 5

2011 Kansas Pork Association Wendell Moyer Scholarship

In 1956, Wendell Moyer helped organize a small group of pork producers into the Kansas Swine Improvement
Association. Their purpose was to work together to make their businesses more profitable while keeping the
swine industry healthy and flourishing statewide. The Kansas Pork Association is working every day to achieve
this same goal.

Through support of youth who have demonstrated an interest in the swine industry, the Kansas Pork Association
is working to encourage participation in pork production while building our leaders of tomorrow.

Current Kansas State University students who have completed between 25 and 100 credit hours are eligible to
apply for a $1,000 scholarship by completing this form by January 26, 2011, and sending it to the Kansas Pork
Association office. Previous winners of any Wendell Moyer Student Enrichment Grants are ineligible to apply.
For additional information, contact the KPA office at (785) 776-0442.

Award Process
• Applications will be reviewed by the Kansas Pork Association.
• The recipient will be notified by January 28, 2011.
• The recipient will be recognized during the KSU Swine Profitability Conference held February 1, 2011, at the
K-State Union. Please plan to attend.
• Awards will be paid directly to the recipient upon proof of enrollment.

Application - Download by clicking on Wendell Moyer Schlolarship Application
• Completed application- Please use the form provided.
• Photo- Each applicant must furnish a recent photograph, no smaller than 2" x 3". Please enclose the picture in
an envelope and attach the envelope to the application. Do not staple or tape the photo directly to the application.
Do not send Polaroid or instant photos. Please identify photo with applicants name on back.
• High School and/or college transcript(s)


Please submit all materials, including the application, photo, and transcript(s) to :
Kansas Pork Association
2601 Farm Bureau Road
Manhattan, KS 66502



Kansas Regulatory News


January 4, 2011


Chief Engineer Orders Meters in Big Blue and Black Vermillion River Basins

On January 3, 2011, Chief Engineer David Barfield issued orders to owners of all non-temporary, non-domestic water rights or water appropriation permits within the Big Blue and Black Vermillion River basins requiring the installation of water flowmeters on all points of diversion (usually wells or surface intakes).

Staff in DWR's Topeka field office will be performing inspections and other follow-up tasks to check meter installations required by these orders.

Public information meeting to be held

In order to facilitate the meter order and help owners understand what needs to be done, DWR staff from the Topeka field office will conduct a public informational meeting on these metering requirements on January 26, 2011, at 6:30 PM at the Community Center in Blue Rapids at 4 Public Square, Blue Rapids, Kansas.  We encourage water right/permit owners in these basins to attend the meeting - whether or not their systems are currently metered - to obtain information about the order, including exceptions, and the specifics necessary to be in compliance with the order.

Metering progress and why it's important

This is part of a multi-year effort to meter (or otherwise precisely measure) all non-domestic water use in the state.  Currently over half of all water right diversions in Kansas are metered, and DWR continues to work toward the goal of having all non-exempt diversions metered.

Accurate measurements of water use are important for determining compliance with water rights, and when necessary, administering water rights.  It also provides data required by interstate compacts and used to manage the state's water resources.

Orders apply to existing meter installations too

Typical propeller meter installation (blue fitting) for a center pivot irrigation system.While all approvals of applications for permits to appropriate water since 1985 have included meter requirements, the current flowmeter criteria were codified in regulation effective September 22, 2000.  The meter orders require that all existing meters and new meters must meet these standards.

Right: Typical propeller meter installation (blue fitting) for a center pivot irrigation system.

Criteria for water flowmeters

Water flowmeters required by the meter orders must be certified for conformity with state specifications and must meet other criteria for spacing, installation in accordance with manufacturer's specifications, full pipe flow, and totalizer capacity.

More details are provided in the Meter Installation Instruction SheetThe preceding link will open in a new browser tab or window. issued with the orders and in the Kansas Water Flowmeter RegulationsThe preceding link will open in a new browser tab or window..

Exceptions granted in certain cases

Water flowmeters installed prior to the meter order are subject to current rules and regulations regarding water flowmeter installation specifications.  However, since the main objective of water flowmeter requirements and the meter orders specifically is to obtain accurate water use data, a currently installed water flowmeter may be a candidate for an exception if it is tested and found to be accurate.  Water flowmeters installed prior to these orders (pre-existing meters) will be evaluated on a case by case basis.

More details are provided in the Meter Installation Instruction SheetThe preceding link will open in a new browser tab or window. issued with the orders and in the Kansas Water Flowmeter RegulationsThe preceding link will open in a new browser tab or window..


KPA Works to find new ways to reach consumers


KPA Launches YouTube Channel

As the YouTube phenomenon continues to grow and millions of people visit the video-sharing site each month, the KPA is making its voice heard. KPA has launched its own YouTube Channel. The channel will be used to educate consumers and inform producers about cooking tips and pork production in Kansas. 

To see the new YouTube page go to http://www.youtube.com/user/KansasPork.


Check out KPA's "Pigging Out and About" Blog


The KPA has launched its first blog "Pigging Out and About". The blog is serving as a consumer restaurant guide and a means to encourage pork consumption. The blog is authored by two Kansas City Barbecue Society judges, Chris Petty and Mike Epler.

The latest post features Oklahoma Joe's BBQ in Kansas City.

To visit the site see http://piggingout-n-about.blogspot.com/.

Make sure to follow along and tell your friends to follow too!



International News


Foot-and-Mouth Outbreak Spreads Through South Korea

South Korea is suffering its worst-ever outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease, with the highly contagious virus spreading to farms across the country despite a nationwide quarantine effort.

The agriculture ministry confirmed that four new outbreaks had been detected -- three on cattle farms and one at a pig farm -- raising the total number of cases in the country to 85, the Yonhap News Agency reported. The disease was first spotted at a pig farm in the southeastern city of Andong on Nov. 28, leading the government to ban livestock markets and severely restrict the transport of animals.

However, foot-and-mouth has continued to sweep across the nation, reaching five of South Korea's nine provinces, as well as its largest seaport, Incheon. To try to stem the spread of the disease, Seoul has ordered the culling of more than 778,850 animals on 2,769 farms, while 700,000 cattle are set to receive vaccines. All 284 cows and 2,700 pigs housed at the latest four outbreak sites will also be destroyed, along with any livestock found within a 1,640-foot radius of the farms.

Foot-and-mouth disease affects all cloven-hoofed animals such as cattle, buffalo, pigs, deer and goats. The disease is harmless to humans but commonly causes blisters on animals' feet, which can result in lameness if they rupture. While most animals will eventually recover from the disease, some may be left with an inflammation of the heart, which is especially fatal for newborns.

It's typically more cost-effective for authorities to slaughter rather than vaccinate animals, as routine blood tests cannot distinguish between infected and vaccinated livestock. The need for further tests can delay the process of a country winning back its disease-free status from the World Organization for Animal Health. And until a nation's farmers get the all clear, they're banned from exporting animals overseas.

However, despite that export risk, Seoul has decided to push ahead with a vaccination campaign for cows to try to prevent the disease from wiping out its entire beef industry. Yonhap reported that the agriculture ministry is also considering giving shots to pigs. As pigs are typically raised on larger farms than cows, an outbreak can quickly cause a spike in the number of livestock needing to be culled.

This is the third time South Korea has been hit by the disease in just over a year. Nearly 50,000 animals were slaughtered following outbreaks last January and April, costing the country more than $220 million, Agence France-Presse reported. And although this latest outbreak is far from over, it has already resulted in more deaths than the previous worst epidemic in 2002, when some 160,000 animals were killed.

NPPC News

FOR THE WEEK ENDING December 24, 2010

FOOD-SAFETY LEGISLATION SIGNED INTO LAW
President Obama yesterday signed into law S.510, the Food Safety Modernization Act. The bill increases the number of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) inspections at food facilities and gives the FDA overall mandatory recall authority of contaminated food products. While pork is not regulated by S. 510, the changes could set a precedent for future meat safety reform. NPPC recently joined interested agriculture groups in voicing concerns over an amendment offered by Sen. John Tester, D-Mont., that exempts small farms and business operations from basic federal food-safety requirements. The amendment rejects a risk-based approach to food-safety regulations and ushers in an ideological view that small farms pose less risk when it comes to food safety.

SENATORS URGE USDA TO CONDUCT GIPSA COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS
Sen. Mike Johanns, R-Neb., this week sent a letter signed by 11 of his colleagues to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, urging him to follow through on his pledge to conduct a cost-benefit analysis of changes to livestock marketing regulations proposed by the Grain Inspection Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA). Secretary Vilsack pledged in a meeting with meat industry officials last week that USDA would conduct "a far more rigorous cost-benefit analysis" of the proposed GIPSA livestock rule. The rule would cost the pork industry, alone, $333 million annually after an initial $69 million expense. NPPC, in comments filed last month, asked that GIPSA withdraw all portions of the proposed rule that went beyond the five issues Congress asked it to address:

NPPC also requested a thorough analysis of the affect on pork producers of any new regulation. To view the Johanns letter, click the following link: Senate letter to Vilsack.

USDA ANNOUNCES ANIMAL HANDLING GUIDELINES
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Services yesterday announced measures it says will improve thetreatment and slaughter of all cattle presented for processing at FSIS-inspected facilities. The five measures, which will be incorporated into the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act, can be seen by clicking the following link: FSIS animal handling guidelines. FSIS is expected to begin collecting public comments on a petition to make the new humane handling measures during inspection applicable for all livestock.



National Pork Board News


New Resource Available to Address High Feed costs

The Pork Checkoff has compiled management tips and resources, along with relevant Checkoff-funded research, to assist producers in identifying opportunities to increase on-farm efficiencies and reduce costs. The new booklet, Practical Ideas to Address High Feed and Production Costs, is available online at pork.org. The 34-page booklet draws upon Checkoff research, the Pork Industry Handbookand other resources such as those found at the U.S. Pork Center of Excellence.


Checkoff Research Prominent at International PRRS Symposium


The Pork Checkoff once again demonstrated its commitment to finding solutions for Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) by helping fund this year's International PRRS Symposium and present more that 26 research studies on the subject. The annual meeting, which just concluded in Chicago, Ill., drew more than 275 researchers and pork-industry participants from 22 countries, making it the world's largest yearly gathering on PRRS.

Checkoff Director of Swine Health Information and Research, Dr. Lisa Becton, was co-chair of the 2010 International PRRS Symposium along with Dr. X.E. Meng of Virginia Tech University. Becton said, "The message we continue to hear is very clear-there are still many unanswered questions regarding the PRRS virus and how to effectively control and eliminate it from swine herds, but we are making progress. That's why this forum and all the participating researchers play such a critical role in helping to maintain the momentum that has been made since over the years."

Because the PRRS virus remains as one of the most costly diseases for America's pork producers-approaching $600 million annually-Becton said it's more imperative than ever to find real-world solutions to stemming this worldwide disease. "Because we have many more people in the world to feed, control and elimination of this virus is critical as it would prevent production wastage on many fronts."

For additional PRRS information, go to pork.org and www.prrs.org. For proceedings from the symposium, go to www.prrssymposium.org

Satisfy a Healthy Appetite with Pork in 2011

Getting fit and losing weight continue to top the list of New Year's resolutions, and the Pork Checkoff is serving up new food for thought about pork can satisfy a healthy appetite.

"This is the year to go lean with pork, which offers a delicious way to liven up everything from salads to stir fry," says Adria Sheil-Brown, manager of nutrition communications and research for the Pork Checkoff.

In its advertisements and e-newsletters during the first quarter of 2011, the Pork Checkoff is taking a new twist on health and wellness by showcasing pork as an ingredient. Both OtherWhiteMeat.com and PorkandHealth.org are showcasing tenderloins to ground pork in new recipes, including  Game Day Pork and Chile Wraps, Pork-Stuffed Peppers, Five-Spice Pork and Apple Salad, and One-Skillet Pork with Wild Rice and Herbs.

To spread the word, the Pork Checkoff is expanding its advertising in early 2011. The recipe for Five-Spice Pork and Apple Salad will appear in print advertisements in Weight Watchers magazine, Cooking Light, Reader's Digest and Prevention. Pork's early 2011 online advertising at WeightWatchers.com, EverydayHealth.com and Google.com will feature Pork and Chile Wraps, along with links that people can click through to find more pork recipes and cooking tips at TheOtherWhiteMeat.com.

Pork is nutritious as it is delicious, says Sheil-Brown, who notes that:

 Today's most popular cuts of pork have 16% less total fat and 27% less saturated fat than they did 20 years ago.

• Ounce-for-ounce, pork tenderloin is as lean as skinless chicken breast, and meets the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) guidelines for "extra lean."

• Cuts of pork that come from the loin - including chops and roasts - and 96% lean ground pork are the leanest cuts of pork available.

• Seven pork cuts meet the USDA guidelines for "lean," with less than 10 grams fat, 4.5 grams saturated fat and 95 milligrams of cholesterol per serving. In fact, pork tenderloin and Canadian bacon qualify for USDA's "extra lean" status.

"There are so many ways to include pork as an ingredient, from using ground pork in tacos to substituting pork tenderloin for chicken in a stir fry," Sheil-Brown says. "Through our health and wellness messages in 2011, we want to encourage consumers to take a new look at pork's possibilities."

 


Meat Export Federation News


October Exceptionally Strong for U.S. Beef, Pork Exports

October was a very strong month for U.S. red meat exports, according to results compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Pork export value was third-highest of the year at $407.8 million - trailing only May at $419.3 million and June at $425.3 million. The October value total was 7 percent higher than September and 9 percent higher than October 2009.

Pork exports post solid increases in several key markets

Pork exports are up only 2 percent in volume over 2009 to 1.39 million metric tons but have posted a 9 percent increase in value to $3.49 billion. For the first 10 months of the year, this puts U.S. pork exports just 3.5 percent behind the all-time record pace of 2008 for export value. The ratio of total U.S. production exported is 23.5 percent, while the value per hog slaughtered is $43.47.

Mexico, the largest volume market for U.S. Pork, has already broken the single-year value record at $762.3 million it set last year. With 437,615 metric tons valued at $795.3 million, exports to Mexico have exceeded last year's record pace by 7 percent in volume and 31 percent in value. But exports to Mexico have been hampered the past few months by a retaliatory 5 percent tariff imposed as a result of the NAFTA trucking dispute.

U.S. Pork is posting another positive year in Japan, reaching 358,578 metric tons valued at more than $1.35 billion. This is up only slightly in volume over last year, but 4 percent higher in value. With a strong finish to 2010, exports to Japan could reach $1.5 billion for the third consecutive calendar year.

Exports to Canada have been very strong in 2010, reaching 149,123 metric tons valued at $511.8 million. This is an 8 percent increase in volume and a 21 percent increase in value over last year. The ASEAN region is also performing very well - up 28 percent in volume at 57,141 metric tons and 42 percent in value at $115 million. This region is led by a very strong performance from the Philippines and Singapore. Intense USMEF marketing efforts in Central America are also paying significant dividends, as the Central/South America region is up 35 percent in volume at 47,343 metric tons and 41 percent in volume at $112.1 million. Honduras and Guatemala are the leading markets in Central America, while Colombia is the pacesetter in South America.

The only markets performing below last year are Korea (where domestic pork prices have been unusually low), Hong Kong, Taiwan and Russia. Exports to Russia got off to an exceptionally slow start in 2010 due to lack of market access for a large number of U.S. plants. That recovery is still not complete, but the situation is showing signs of improvement. Taiwan's zero tolerance for ractopamine residue is often cited as a reason for slowing activity by U.S. exporters.

Editor's notes: Export results include both muscle cuts and variety meat, unless otherwise noted One metric ton = 2,204.62 pounds

 

KPA Producer Resources

KPA works on biosecurity education with Kansas Department of Agriculture's Division of Water Resources

After recent reports of Division of Water Resources personnel visiting multiple farms in one day, KPA staff has provided education to the Division on industry-accepted biosecurity protocols. As part of the process, the Division has agreed to follow protocols for individual farms if the information is provided to the agency.

To ease this process, the KPA has developed a standard form for your use. To download, click on biosecurity.

Kansas Animal Health Department Facility License

Please remember the rules pertaining to the Kansas Animal Health Department's facility license changed during the recent legislative session. Swine, sheep and goats were separated from cattle. The fees for swine will now be figured on an animal unit basis. Please make sure you received the correct form in your mailing. If not, the form can be downloaded by clicking on Swine Form.

KPA Community Outreach Program

The Pork Community Outreach is designed to assist individual pork producers in becoming more involved and positively visible in their local communities. The KPA is offering matching funds on the expenses on selected community relations activities. The purpose of this program is to multiply the positive effects of pork producer involvement in the communities where hogs are raised.

To be eligible you must:

Fill out a cost share request form and submit it to the KPA at least two weeks prior to your event and submit design ideas to the KPA so that appropriate logos and messages may be included.

Click on Community Outreach to download a form.


PQA Plus Site Assessment Rebate Program

The Kansas Pork Association, the National Pork Board and the National Pork Producers Council are encouraging all producers to become PQA Plus certified and achieve PQA Plus Site Status. The purpose of this program is to encourage producers to be proactive in providing the best possible care for their animals and show commitment to the ethical principles of pork production as outlined in the We Care responsible pork initiative.

Having a PQA Plus advisor review your operation can both improve the well-being and productivity of animals in your care by noting changes or additions that may not otherwise be noticed.

The Kansas Pork Association is offering a $100 rebate to Kansas Pork Producers completing a PQA Plus Site Assesment. The funding is available on a first-come-first-serve basis.

The following requirements and stipulations apply:

Click here to download the rebate form.

Please contact Tim Stroda at kpa@kspork.org or (785) 776-0442 with questions or to see if funds are still available.


KPA Classifieds

The KPA Producer-to-Producer Classified Section is provided free of charge to producers who are looking for a way to advertise to other producers. Contact the KPA office to get your ad listed.



Kansas GOLD Inc. working to update producer's information Kansas GOLD

Garry Keeler, program coordinator for Kansas GOLD Inc., is now working to update the yearly information needed to recertify facilities. Kansas GOLD Inc. will be contacting producers as their certification becomes due. The program has also recently started working with several producers to begin the process of applying for new permits.

The GOLD program is designed to ensure that when a regulator visits your farm, the information they request can be found easily and is packaged in a pre-approved format. The process begins with a visit to your farm by the Kansas GOLD coordinator, who will begin by examining your KDHE permit for each facility number. This permit tells the coordinator what information needs to be collected and kept on file.

Kansas GOLD Inc. provides a cost-effective manner to ensure your operation is in compliance. For information, please click on GOLD or contact the KPA office at (785) 776-0442 or e-mail to kpa@kspork.org